Hollow Hill Updates

Hi,

This is a brief note to let you know what’s going on with Hollow Hill.

I’ve been planning to find more time to expand it, and restore the most popular older articles.

About a week ago, hacking attempts damaged the site. The site had to be restored, mostly from a recent backup, but least partially from scratch. So, you’ve probably noticed some “new” articles that aren’t so new.

The site is better protected (and backed up) now. And, starting today, I’m planning to restore a few articles (from the original Hollow Hill site), every week.

I’ll be editing and updating them, too, as I post them. So, expect just a couple of articles per week, at best. (If you’re a friend who receives my articles by email, they’ll be sent to you as they’re posted.)

Thanks for your interest!

Welcome to Hollow Hill

Fiona Broome is rebuilding Hollow Hill, her original ghost hunting website… but with a slightly different emphasis. Mostly, she’s focusing on patterns that connect, perhaps explain, and even predict odd and paranormal activity.

This website will include…

  • Gilson Road cemetery - beam of light
    Odd photo, Gilson Road Cemetery (Nashua, NH)

    Fiona Broome’s most popular articles from the original (1999 – 2014) HollowHill.com ghost hunting website. (They’re in the Ghost Hunting category.)

  • New articles about paranormal research and cross-discipline theories.

What’s here, so far

  • Fiona’s best 2016 “Broome Theory” articles explaining some of her quirky, not-quite sci-fi theories. (They’re speculation. Even Fiona isn’t convinced this is real.)
  • A few classic HollowHill.com ghost hunting articles, lightly updated. (More are being added, steadily.)

Las Vegas Anomalies – Dec 2015

Las VegasSeveral odd things happened in Las Vegas in late December 2015. In a city where “odd” is a way of life, anything beyond their “normal” is especially interesting.

This is a good example of data points — a specific location, and closely connected events (times) — that may relate to my theory about alternate realities. At the moment, I’m speculating that something happened around that location… something we don’t understand, yet. And, whatever that was — a temporal distortion, perhaps — caused people to do things they’d never do in a normal setting.

Here’s what happened:

First Las Vegas Anomaly

First, a woman drove her car onto a crowded sidewalk, just outside the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino. Descriptions of the event varied, but many suggested that the driver slowed the car and then hit the accelerator a second time, mowing down nearly 40 people.

At the time, the woman said that she couldn’t explain what happened, and she’d lost control of the car.

  • Per ABC News: “KSNV-TV says the crash occurred in front of the Paris Hotel & Casino and Planet Hollywood Las Vegas Resort & Casino on South Las Vegas Boulevard, north of Harmon Avenue. The crash took place about 6 p.m. The Miss Universe pageant was being held at the Planet Hollywood at the time of the crash.”

Later, news reports said she’d tested positive for marijuana, but that’s odd, as well. Per the University of Washington, “Marijuana usually has a sedating effect on most users, making it much less likely to cause violence…” Nevertheless, she described being under stress, and that can be a factor in violent behavior.

Second Las Vegas Anomaly

Meanwhile, a few hundred yards away, the Planet Hollywood Resort & Casino was hosting the 2015 Miss Universe pageant.

In a baffling blunder, Steve Harvey, an experienced entertainer, crowned the wrong contestant. It’s still unclear whether he misread the card — truly odd for someone accustomed to reading from cards — or if the teleprompter script was wrong.

No matter what the explanation, Harvey crowned Miss Colombia… and then had to remove the crown and announce that Miss Philippines was the real winner.

Third Anomaly

Two nights later, Las Vegas was one of the most-reported viewing points for a bright light soaring through the night sky. Officials explained it as space debris from a Russian rocket.

That’s nothing baffling, but it is odd, since the Las Vegas sky is so well-lit by traffic and commercial signs, anything in the sky must be extraordinarily bright.

Mandela Effect Reports

Initially readers alerted me to these “coincidences” at my Mandela Effect website. (Read the comments there; that site’s article is almost identical to this one.)

However, as the stories unfolded, I couldn’t see a clear connection to an alternate reality.

On the other hand, when I see an odd series of events like this — close in time and location — I note it as a data point to add to my Broome Theory research. I describe these as “blips” and I look for related, consistent paranormal reports that follow the same patterns.

Ghost Hunting Sites – Legal and Illegal

Security warning sign
photo courtesy of Jason Antony and FreeImages.com

When selecting ghost hunting sites, know the laws in your area, and how ferociously they’re enforced.

In the past, ghost hunters could discreetly slip into haunted sites that weren’t clearly open to the public. If it was public property — or abandoned — and it wasn’t posted, some investigators thought, “Why not?”

I’ve always advised against investigating sites that aren’t clearly open to the public for ghost research.

For example, in New England, Danvers (MA) State Hospital site has been notorious for trespassing, vandalism, and arrests of well-meaning ghost enthusiasts.

It’s one of many locations with eerie reputations, and vigilant security or police patrols.

Like many other locations in isolated spots, it’s easy for police to observe trespassers from a distance.

Ghost hunters are at risk as soon as they drive up the road or driveway, or turn on their flashlights. Quite literally, they shed light on their own crimes.

Today, surveillance cameras and other devices — similar to the tools we use in our research — make trespassing even more risky.

A Cautionary Tale

The following December 2015 story — from KUTV (Utah, USA) — is a good example of what can happen if you break the law.

‘Haunted’ Property Owner Asks Trespassers to Keep Out

(KUTV)In Northern Utah, authorities are looking to the public in help finding a few people they want to talk to after vandalism was discovered at a former Catholic retreat believed to be haunted. The pictures are clear, taken from surveillance video a new property owner installed in recent weeks… Despite multiple signs posted on the property – “No Trespassing” and “Keep Out”, threatening fines and jail time for violators, individuals are still coming through the area… In some publications and online sites, the area has been described as a good ghost hunting location, a fun place to take a date and get a thrill, but authorities say this is no laughing matter. (Emphasis added.)

[Click here to read the rest of the article at KUTV’s website.]

That particular location — St. Anne’s, in Logan Canyon — is mentioned at many websites, including credible YouTube videos, as a reliable place to find ghosts. You can even find St. Anne’s ghost story at otherwise-trustworthy websites like the Weird US site.

This is why you must investigate site accessibility, even before you decide if a location might be haunted enough to explore.

If you don’t, or if you choose to risk getting caught, the quality of surveillance footage — day or night — can be good enough to convict you.

Don’t expect to see warning signs.

Don’t waste your time looking for the cameras, either. They can be tiny or well-concealed in hollowed-out tree branches or fence posts.

Ghost hunting might not be as popular as it once was, but modern surveillance equipment has become inexpensive and easy to use. Many locations are using it to detect trespassers, and fine them for vandalism they might be responsible for.

In the case of the Utah ghost hunters, that’s a $10,000 door that someone had kicked in.

(Really, if you’re facing a jury and trying to explain that, yes, you did trespass, but no, you didn’t damage anything, do you expect them to believe you? Is ghost hunting worth that risk?)

Know Local Laws

Trespassing can be a felony in some American communities. Jail time can be as much as a year, and fines can be as high as $4,000 per person, at the discretion of the judge.

If you’re an American convicted of a felony, you can be denied your right to vote in the U.S. You can also be denied travel to some other countries, including Canada and parts of Europe. If an employer or landlord runs a background check on you, a felony conviction looks very bad.

Since my earliest articles at Yankee Haunts (mid-1990s) and HollowHill.com, I’ve always focused on haunted locations people can investigate, with permission. Nearly all sites I talk about — at websites, on TV and radio, and in books — are open to the public.

What happened to the kids who were caught in Utah could happen to anyone. Don’t take that chance.

What to Do

If you’re not sure whether a location is open to the public for ghost investigations:

  • Visit the location and look for signs, or ask the staff (if any) about restrictions.
  • Ask the reference librarian at the local public library, or check with the regional historical society.
  • Stop at the local visitors’ center or chamber of commerce, and verify the location and the hours it’s open to the public.

Of course, I always recommend visiting each haunted site during the daytime, to evaluate it for research and plan your investigation.

But, if that’s not possible, be sure to confirm when the location is open to the public for ghost hunting, and if any fees, rules, or limits apply.

Or, limit your ghost hunting to daytime hours, as well as ghost tours, public ghost hunting events, and ghost vigils.

[For more articles about ghost hunting, visit Fiona’s EncounterGhosts.com website.]

Tinnitus as a Marker – EMF or Alt Realities

Soundboard
photo courtesy of fabricio scaff and freeimages.com

Tinnitus could be another marker, signaling a time or location (or both) where the “veil between the worlds” is thinner,  or access points between realities are available. This could be a temporary opening or something more permanent.

I’m especially interested in whether changes in tinnitus — a persistent or irregular ringing in the ears, commonly affecting about 10% of the population — are just more indication of increase EMF, or distinct markers in themselves. We’ve discussed related topics in several Mandela Effect conversations.

However, I’m not the only person to question whether tinnitus and EMF might be related. For example, people have been discussing the connection at sites such as Tinnitus Talk.

In fact, I may be fairly late to this party, as I’ve found a study that concludes, “Our data indicate that tinnitus is associated with subjective electromagnetic hypersensitivity.”

Also, this very loosely connects with Mr. Stain’s cryptic warnings that included cell phone use. However, I can see another side to the cell phone warning: not that cell phones are causing society’s demise, but that they can trigger normal tinnitus (or numb us to its steady ringing) so we aren’t as aware of the times and places where between-worlds divisions are thinner.

Either way, I’m very interested in what people notice about tinnitus in relation to all kinds of EMF variations, and all kinds of paranormal activity.

This includes perceived volume, pitch, duration, whether it’s predominantly in one ear or the other, and if a compass direction is involved. I’m also looking for patterns in tinnitus changes, related to local time and sidereal time.

This isn’t about tinnitus cures, related medical symptoms, and so on. My interest is fairly narrow, and focusing on any patterns related to paranormal activity (including the Mandela Effect) and perceived tinnitus changes — before, during, or immediately after the event — or in relation to locations associated with sacred sites, ghosts, regular UFO sightings (I’m thinking of the Marfa Lights, etc.), and so on.

Alternate Realities, Portals, and EMF Surges

creepy door openingEMF (or electromagnetic field/s) may be a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. That’s what Wikipedia says. That site also says “The electromagnetic field extends indefinitely throughout space and describes the electromagnetic interaction. It is one of the four fundamental forces of nature (the others are gravitation, weak interaction and strong interaction).”

Note: The relationship between EMF and gravitation could be important, since physics studies have raised many questions about gravity, such as whether it’s leaking into our world or out of it.

If gravity can leak across supposed brane barriers, why not EMF, as well?

Until recently, I’d been focusing on anomalous (unexplained) EMF surges at apparently haunted locations. Specifically, I’ve been studying EMF spikes noted on sensitive detection devices, where the EMF may be fleeting, not repeated (at that precise location, for some time), and without apparent origin.

Many ghost hunters enthusiastically claim that the EMF represents spiritual energy, or a “ghost.” (Likewise, they point to photographic anomalies and happily believe they’re pictures of actual ghosts. If that makes sense to them, I’m happy to agree.)

For years, I’ve been a contrarian. I’m not convinced that all EMF anomalies at haunted settings are actually spirits. (I maintain that attitude about all anomalies — including “ghost photos” — recorded at sites that might be haunted. I believe in ghosts. I believe that consistent anomalies occur at sites with a history of ghostly phenomena. I’m simply not sure that all anomalies (even at profoundly haunted sites) are caused by actual ghosts.

Here’s how I look at anomalies at haunted places:

 

ghosts and anomalies - venn diagram

I believe some EMF spikes occur when a door between realities opens, and — like gravity — electromagnetic energy leaks into our world. (One of my 2008 articles on this topic: EMF Reality Check – Are EMF Really Ghosts?)

I don’t want to spoil anyone’s happy investigations, if he or she is content to believe that the EMF spike on a K-II meter, Ovilus, or Ghost Meter Pro is actually Great-Aunt Harriet. For all I know, that particular encounter might represent spiritual energy from the beloved aunt.

However, I think that some EMF is leaking through portals (or access points between realities), and that these same points are where ghosts, faeries, and possibly Bigfoot or even UFOs are entering and exiting our world.

I’m not an expert in the latter two fields, and haven’t made up my mind about them, but I don’t want to leave out anything that might fit this theory. From a somewhat sci-fi perspective, it’s possible other civilizations have mastered use of these portals, and use them to visit other worlds. For all I know, it might save fuel or time, or both.

The Hum, mysterious booming sounds, and even EVP (electronic voice phenomena, sometimes believed to be voices “from the other side”) might come through.

Here’s what that Venn diagram looks like, as I imagine it:

realities venn diagram

 

And, those same points might be available for human transference, resulting in what I’ve described as the Mandela Effect, or cross-reality travel that results in alternate memories (history that doesn’t match this reality).

It’s a highly speculative theory. I’m not sure how likely any of this is.

However, I think it’s as good an explanation as any, related to EMF at paranormal locations, and I think it opens many avenues (no pun intended) for research into a variety of odd and paranormal phenomena.

Ghosts of Salem, Massachusetts

Salem is haunted. Not just by the ghosts of the Salem Witch Trials, but by other troubled spirits as well.

Rebecca Nurse houseI grew up not far from Salem, and I’m familiar with its ghosts… the ones people talk about, as well as they ones they don’t.

From 2008 through 2010, I researched on-site.

Over those two years, I discovered a wealth of hidden ghost stories related to Salem and the city’s famous Witch Trials.

(Of course, it helps that I’m descended from two 17th-century Salem families. Perhaps that gives me additional resonance with the spirits of Salem.)

Three very narrow and straight ley lines connect 90% of the hauntings around Salem. They predict where strange things will happen, usually within a few yards.

In the future, I hope to write a book about this fascinating topic.

In the meantime, I’m happy to share some of my research with you.

More information:

The following links will take you to EncounterGhosts.com, where you can read many more of my ghost hunting articles from the past 15+ years.

Salem’s “Judges’ Line” locations – Energy lines (ley lines) that connect many of Salem’s most haunted sites.

Gallows Hill – So far, no one knows where the real “gallows hill” was, where the witches were hung and their bodies discarded. However, the namesake location is worth visiting (if only to say you’ve been there) and may offer some research opportunities.

Witch Hill (aka Whipple Hill) – One of the most infamous locations connected with apparent “witch” activity in Salem Village. It’s also one of the loveliest and eeriest sites for ghost hunting.

GhoStock 7 Report: Salem Inn – A brief summary of my 2009 investigation at one of Salem’s most charmingly haunted inns.

Book ETA: Unknown. Discussions have stalled with my publisher, and my contract prohibits me from writing this book for any other publishing house.

Salem’s Haunted Judges Line – Map

The Salem Judges Line shows that patterns can predict paranormal activity.

In general, patterns emerge when I study profoundly haunted areas. I believe those patterns identify good locations for paranormal research.

In my 2007 book, The Ghosts of Austin, Texas, I talked about two major patterns connecting almost all hauntings in downtown Austin. (One of them relates to Shoal Creek. The other is connected to the Austin Ripper, America’s first serial killer.)

In Salem, Massachusetts, I’ve found different kinds of patterns.

Ley Lines in Salem

One pattern follows intriguing lines. I was the first to discover these ghostly tracks across Salem and Boston’s North Shore. There are several.

In Salem, each line suggests connections between scenes of violence… and possibly ghostly energy.

I’ve called one of these lines “The Judges’ Line.” It seems to be a ley line.

Ghost batLey lines are lines or paths that connect sites with unusual energy. They could be major churches or temples, sites of violence and tragedy, or another anomalous connection.

Some speculate that energy flows along those paths. In other words, the energy was there before the church was built or the violence occurred.

That energy may magnify the emotions — or affect the thinking — of people when they are on or near a ley line.

The Judge Connection

Oddly, when I map the significant homes and businesses related to the judicial side of the Salem Witch Trials, they follow a line.

Even stranger, that line also indicates where modern-day Salem judges have purchased homes.

The line extends directly to Gallows Hill Park, one of the most likely sites of the 1692 hangings during the Salem Witch Trials.

Here’s what this line looks like, related to the entire Salem, Massachusetts area:

Salem Judges Line

In many cases, this line is ruler-straight, and it’s feet wide, not miles.

Here’s my preliminary, hand drawn map of the main locations on the Salem Judges Line:

Salem Judges Line - details

The Salem Judges Line

All of the following points are related to the Salem Witch Trials.

  • Numbers represent sites related to accusers or the judicial system.
  • Letters are related to victims of the trials.

1. Chestnut Street (represented by a heavy black line) – Many judges and elected officials chose this street for their homes. Through the 21st century, they still do.

2. Judge Corwin’s home, also known as “Witch House” since he condemned so many witches during the Salem Witch Trials. The house’s original location was closer to the line. Later residents moved it.

3. Judge Hathorne’s home, also associated with the Salem Witch Trials. (Nathaniel Hawthorne changed the spelling of his name to avoid any association with this ancestor.)

4. Sheriff George Corwin’s home – George Corwin was the son of the judge (#2) and benefited by seizing the property of convicted and admitted witches.

5. The home of Samuel Shattuck, whose testimony helped convict Bridget Bishop, one of the first Witch Trial victims.

6. The home of Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Governor Simon Bradstreet (1603 – 1697).

7. John Higginson Jr. lived here. He was the local magistrate. The Hawthorne Hotel was later built on this property.

8. Jacob Manning, a blacksmith, forged the shackles worn by many Witch Trial victims.

9. Thomas Beadle’s tavern, where Witch Trial inquests were held.

A. The home of Bridget Bishop, a Witch Trial victim who may be among the ghosts at the Lyceum Restaurant, now on that site.

B. Ann Pudeator, a Witch Trial victim whose specter was seen walking along Salem Common, even before her execution.

C. The home of John and Mary English, one of the wealthiest families in Colonial Salem. They were accused but escaped to New York.

D. Alice Parker’s home, owned by John and Mary English. Ms. Parker was accused of witchcraft and put to death.

Other Salem Sites on the Line

The slightly triangular area near 7 and B represents Salem Common.

Gallows Hill Park is indicated on the far left side of the map. The “Judges Line” — generally indicated in yellow — points directly to it.

The small green areas near points 6, 7 and 8 represent sites with paranormal activity or they are scenes of violence in the 19th and 20th century… or both.

As I continue my research, I’m finding even more sites that will be represented with red dots. Most of them are along the Salem Judges Line.

It’s a little chilling. I wonder why these people felt so drawn to this particular energy path.

More articles about haunted Salem, Massachusetts

For more articles about Salem’s haunted places, visit EncounterGhosts.com for my Ghosts of Salem, Massachusetts article.

Carbon Monoxide and Unexplained Phenomena

Carbon monoxide can cause unusual indoor experiences. It’s also dangerous.

Tenants and homeowners can check for it, themselves. In some American states, carbon monoxide detectors are required in all apartments.

However, residents might not replace those detectors as often as necessary. Generally, carbon monoxide detectors last five to seven years. After that, they’re unreliable.

DangerThe following are typical complaints when people think their homes might be haunted.

  • “In that part of the house, I get shaky, dizzy, and I feel weak all over.”
  • “I feel a tightness in my chest, and I can’t catch my breath. Do you suppose the ghost died of a heart attack?”
  • “I’m okay during the day, but at night — especially when it’s cold out — something floats into my room through the bedroom window, and I can’t breathe.”
  • “The baby gets fussy in that room. It’s like she’s looking at something invisible. Also, the dog won’t go in there, ever.”
  • “I’m fine all day, but when I go to bed, I get headaches. Sometimes I feel kind of sick. I have to get up and open the window, just to feel the breeze. About an hour or two later, around midnight, everything’s fine again.”

Every one of those phenomena can be caused by carbon monoxide poisoning.

In any house or building, carbon monoxide levels are among the first things to check.

This is especially true if reports started when the house was sealed up for the winter, or — in warm climates — for the summer.

The following is an edited excerpt from the book, Is Your House Haunted?, by Fiona Broome.

Before you do anything else…

Check the carbon monoxide levels at every site that might be haunted.

Carbon monoxide is nicknamed “the silent killer.” Pets and children often the first to react. Carbon monoxide (CO), also called carbonous oxide, is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. In large quantities, it is toxic to humans and animals. It can kill you.

Sources include gas appliances, wood stoves, car exhaust, blocked flues, and even cigarette smoke.

Don’t expect everyone to react to carbon monoxide at the same time. Some people may show symptoms before others do.

Any of the following symptoms may indicate high levels of carbon monoxide.

  • Headaches.
  • A tight sensation in the chest.
  • Nausea.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Vomiting.
  • Dizziness.
  • Fatigue.
  • A feeling of weakness.
  • Confusion or disorientation.
  • Visual disturbances.
  • Fainting and seizures.
  • Flu symptoms.
  • Infants may be irritable.
  • Pets can avoid certain areas.

Carbon monoxide can affect the heart and central nervous system. It can raise blood pressure. Carbon monoxide poisoning can damage the fetus of a pregnant woman.

In the UK, the US, and Canada laws recommend (or require) carbon monoxide detectors in homes. New and long-time homeowners may not realize that.

Even if the homeowner has no fireplace or woodstove, and no gas appliances, check the levels anyway.

A neighbor may use a wood stove or work on his car in a nearby garage. If you sleep with your window open, elevated carbon monoxide could cause your nightly problems.

If you investigate haunted sites, be sure your home has very low levels of carbon monoxide, too. Once you’ve been sensitized to carbon monoxide, even low levels might trigger your symptoms. Rule this out, immediately.

In every potentially haunted house, if any symptoms match the warning list, check carbon monoxide levels.

Monitors are important

Be sure the house has working carbon monoxide detectors installed. They should be in use for at least a week, before an investigation.

Also, many paranormal investigators carry a handheld monitor.

Note: Before buying a handheld carbon monoxide meter, be sure to read the reviews. If you’re investigating haunted homes and you can’t afford a good carbon monoxide detector, don’t bother with a cheap one.

Fiona's adviceI’ve had success with a monitor that’s designed to be placed on a wall. I just prop it on the floor or on a table, and leave it there for at least an hour. (Overnight is better, but a severe monoxide issue would probably trigger a sensitive alarm within 30 to 60 minutes.)

It was far less expensive than a handheld monitor, and the reviews were good, so I decided to try it.

So far, so good!

At the very least, ask the local fire department to test the air for the homeowner. (They may refer you to a community office that does this, free of charge.)

A working carbon monoxide detector is important. An old one isn’t good enough. Worse, if the homeowner is using a cheap, unreliable detector, that could put you and your client at risk.

In any indoor paranormal investigation, check for carbon monoxide. Use a good detector or have the homeowner or someone else handle that part of the investigation.

For more information about ghosts and haunted houses, visit Fiona’s ghost hunting website, EncounterGhosts.com

Eloise: The Asylum that Started It All

“Eloise: The Asylum That Started The Whole Mess” (above) is not a ghost video, it’s a tribute, and a downright chilling one. The really creepy part..? It’s not hyperbole. The information in that video can be confirmed.

Watch it before the videos about ghosts at Eloise, Michigan.

This site was first a stagecoach stop, the Black Horse Tavern. Then it was purchased and turned into a poorhouse, and then became a medical facility. In its various incarnations it was a sanitorium for victims of tuberculosis, and a mental hospital.

Its names included the Eloise Infirmary for the Sick and Elderly, and the Eloise Hospital for the Insane.

Several locations associated with Eloise sound as if they should be haunted. In fact, I’d expect this to be one of the creepiest haunted hospital sites in America.

More history of Eloise:

“Eloise: Mostly a memory” (This video is no longer available at YouTube. I’m keeping this note here, in case it returns. It was a great history.)

Next, “Spirit Caught on Camera In Haunted Eloise Asylum” includes highlights of a brief investigation inside Eloise – Visual anomalies, some clear Ghost Box responses, and lots of NSFW language from the investigators. It’s a good balance of evidence.

Next, a daytime tour by the Dearborn Paranormal Research Society of Michigan. Sound quality is challenging to listen to, dialing the levels up and down, but the information is excellent.

“Eloise Mental Hospital – Ghost Hunters” isn’t the Ghost Hunters’ TV show; it’s a news report by a startled reporter who — apparently — didn’t really expect to encounter anything at Eloise.

Parody? The next video includes a daytime tour by Michigan Paranormal Investigators, interviews about (fictional) Patient 626, and a night-time investigation with impossibly clear EVP. This is how many “ghost stories” are created. In five years, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear about genuine phenomena related to the invented patient’s ghosts.

And now, only to better understand what you’ll find at Eloise, the next video series looked like a Ghost Hunters parody. Mostly, it showed foolhardy investigating, with some inaccurate history thrown in. These 12-year-old kids may have encountered some paranormal activity. But, they made such serious research blunders, it’s impossible to sort fact from fantasy.

The worst part is: They’re clearly breaking the law. This kind of prank is unacceptable and it gives serious ghost hunters a bad name. (Two words: No trespassing. How smart does anyone have to be, to understand what that means? Yes, it’s a rhetorical question borne of frustration.)

[Update: These YouTube videos seem to be online, but can be viewed “by permission only.” I’m leaving the descriptions here in case that changes.]

  • Part One – Stylish introduction, and a quick daytime tour of the key locations at the Eloise site.
  • Part Two – More criminal trespassing. The smokestack building doesn’t seem especially haunted to me, but the visual imagery is impressive. It’s ideal for photographers who like abandoned sites. I’m not convinced that this part of the complex is worth paranormal research.
  • Part Three is more of the same. It shows more criminal activity no 12-year-old should try… or anyone of any other age, either. Mostly, the video shows a bunch of kids scaring themselves. The “reveal” (or summary) starts at 4:41 in the video, and some of the evidence is worth a second look. Unfortunately, this silliness erodes any credibility. That’s just one of many unfortunate aspects of what we see in these videos.

Resources for investigators