Bennington Triangle – Paranormal Sites

Vermont’s Bennington Triangle has a fascinating history.  It’s a lovely place to hike, but it’s not without significant dangers. Like the Bermuda Triangle, people vanish without explanation in the Bennington Triangle.

Paranormal Triangles – Bermuda, Bridgewater, and Bennington

(As I type that, I wonder, “What is it about triangles and the letter B?”)

More about the Bennington Triangle, where people vanishThe “triangle” phenomena are interesting to study.  The most famous of these locations is, of course, the Bermuda Triangle.

However, the trouble with the Bermuda Triangle is (a) that location is huge and mostly over the water, and (b) it has been so frequently researched, there’s a massive amount of information to sift through to find any patterns… or any angle or explanation that’s been overlooked.

All we can say is: We don’t know why it’s so strange.

Another triangle, the Bridgewater Triangle (MA), offers some interesting quirks that haven’t been fully explored, but the area is densely populated. That’s both a plus (lots of eyewitnesses) and a minus (many locations are difficult to access or on private property).  In addition, sensational headlines and a lurid history sometime attract thrill-seekers and people who think it’s funny to terrify others.

We have enough challenges in paranormal research.  Frankly, we don’t need stupid people making our work more difficult.  Personally, I’m not impressed enough with the Bridgewater Triangle to explore it after dark.

The Bennington Triangle – Where People Vanish

The Bennington Triangle (VT) has remained under the radar for many people.

I’ve deliberately avoided saying much about it, because I believe that location may be very dangerous.

But, as ghost hunting is becoming less trendy, I’m more comfortable talking about it now.

Bennington’s relative isolation also makes it a less-accessible location for thrill seekers. That may be a very good thing.

Also, it’s not really a ghost hunters’ kind of site. A ghostly encounter might be possible, but that’s not the main reason paranormal researchers quietly study Bennington and vicinity.

More about Bennington’s Mysteries

For the original, most intriguing article about the Bennington Triangle,  view this archived link.

Wikipedia gives more geographic information, at Bennington Triangle.

The HauntingAlso check the Virtual Vermonter stories about the Bennington Triangle.

It was no surprise when I learned that author Shirley Jackson (author of “The Haunting of Hill House,” the basis of my favorite fiction-based ghost movie) chose to live there.  I’m not sure I would.

If real gateways to other dimensions exist, the Bennington Triangle is probably one of them.  I’m happy to do most of my Bennington Triangle research off-site.

The links I’ve listed are the tip of the iceberg.

Witnesses are Afraid of Something

The stories that come out of the Bennington Triangle… they’re not like any other stories I’ve heard in the New England area.

Some of them are terrifying. They make no sense.  Even stranger: The people who share their first-person Bennington and Glastenbury stories are as credible as any I’ve met.

These aren’t the kinds of people you can dismiss as over-imaginative, delusional, pathological liars, attention-seekers, or substance abusers.

Most of them seem uncomfortable describing their encounters.

Then, once they start sharing the details, it’s like they’re reliving the experience.  They get pale, break out in perspiration, and tremble a little.

Part-way into the story, they go silent, shrug, and say, “I’ve said enough.”  After that, you can’t get another word out of them… not about the Bennington Triangle, anyway.

At a later date, I may post more of my own research.  The deeper you look into this strange phenomenon, the weirder it gets.

Bennington Triangle – America’s Weirdest?

Bennington Triangle - People vanishThe Bennington Triangle may be America’s weirdest paranormal triangle.

Of course, it’s not the only one. The Bermuda Triangle is far more famous. But, The trouble with the Bermuda Triangle is:

(a) its location is huge and mostly over the water, and

(b) it has been so frequently researched, there’s a massive amount of information to sift through to find any patterns… or any credible, overlooked theories.

The Bridgewater Triangle (MA) offers some interesting quirks that haven’t been fully explored. But, that area is densely populated.

That’s both a plus (lots of eyewitnesses) and a minus (many locations are difficult to access or on private property).

By contrast, the Bennington Triangle (VT) has remained under the radar for many people.

Thank heavens for the Wayback Machine, so I could read this 1999 article: Vanishing Point, by Carl Hughes. If you’re interested in it, print it out; it could vanish from the Internet.

Bennington’s Strange Stories

That article begins:

A strange celebration took place recently around Bennington in Vermont, north-eastern USA. The festival celebrates 50 years since anyone has vanished.

Bizarre, you may think, but not nearly as bizarre as what happened in this area between the years 1920 and 1950.

The actual date for celebration was October 28 that is when in 1950 a young hiker named Freida Langer became the last victim of what is known locally as the Bennington Triangle. Like dozens of others before her, Freida disappeared as completely as if the Starship Enterprise had beamed her up.

The article continues, describing the bizarre discovery of Freida’s body, seven months later.

But then the article explains:

At least Freida did return eventually, albeit dead. In most other Bennington Triangle cases the victims were never found. They disappeared from their gardens, from their beds, from petrol stations, from log cabins. One man, James Tetford, even vanished while sitting on a bus.

Those stories are very weird.

Research Opportunity… or Danger?

I stumbled onto those stories when I researched facts behind the movie, The Haunting, and – in 2018 – the Netflix “Hill House” series. (Yes, there is a connection between the Bennington, and the Hill House stories.)

And then I heard about a couple who – if they weren’t doing drugs – encountered something extraordinary. To me, it sounds like an alternate reality, “hiding in plain sight.”

But anyway, I think the Bennington Triangle offers great opportunities for serious investigators… and genuine risks. (Read my longer Bennington Triangle article, first.)

The challenge is knowing where to look, and what to avoid.

Until we know more, Bennington is probably a great location for hiking or to enjoy Vermont’s fall foliage.

Just don’t go there alone.