Ghostly News and a CT Ley Line – 10 Oct 2016

October is here, and so are articles that show a profound misunderstanding of what ghost hunters do.

I’m rather irked reading the insults in “Study links poor understanding of the physical world to religious and paranormal beliefs.”

Tarring all religions and paranormal beliefs with the same brush, the article –  based on a study by Marjaana Lindeman and Annika Svedholm-Häkkinen of the University of Helsinki – claims:

“The results showed that religious and paranormal (supernatural) beliefs correlated with all variables that were included: low systemizing, poor intuitive physics skills, poor mechanical ability, poor mental rotation, low school grades in mathematics and physics, poor common knowledge about physical and biological phenomena…”

That list continues, but I think you get the point.

And, I know quite a few highly educated priests and professors who’d disagree with that correlation.

Oh, I’m not disputing the study results, just the sampling they used or the methods, or both.

It’s typical of the bias we deal with as researchers.

But, for every annoying article like that one, I find several news stories that intrigue me.

I started with an article about a haunted site in Pennsylvania. Then, I found a news article about a Connecticut ghost investigation. After that, I started connecting the dots – literally. In the explanation that follows, you’ll see how I use news stories and maps to find even more interesting places to investigate.

ghostbat

theatre curtainFirst, there’s the Casino Theater in Vandergrift, PA (USA). It’s opening for an investigation. The site’s history sounds like it’s worth a visit.

I’m always interested in haunted theaters. An unusually high percentage of theaters have ghost stories, and very obliging ghosts.

I mention them in my article, What Makes a Great Haunted Research Site.

  • Theater ghosts often respond well to direction (just as actors do).
  • Backstage, almost every theatre has at least one haunted dressing room… with a juicy story.
  • And, almost every theater has a ghost that supposedly sits or stands in the dark, near the back of the theater. In some cases, a cigarette may be involved, as well as visible wisps of smoke, or a smoky aroma.

If you’re in the Vandergrift area, learn more at this article: Casino Theater paranormal investigation attracts believers, skeptics.

ghostbat

Then there’s the Dr. Ashbel Woodward House Museum in Franklin, Connecticut. It used to be the home of a medical practice. Today, it’s a historical site.

A news story describes a recent investigation at the site. I’m not sure it’s very haunted, but it has the features I look for in a historical site that’s likely to have ghosts of some kind.

If you’re near Connecticut, the article – no longer online – was in the Norwich Bulletin. You may find a copy of it locally: Ghost hunters look for paranormal activity at Franklin museum.

About 15 minutes away, a “My Ghost Story” episode was filmed at 3 Boswell Avenue in nearby Norwich (CT). Apparently, some ghosts still linger. (The segment was “The Grim Rapper” from “I Am Full of Madness” that aired 14 May 2011.)  In the Norwich Bulletin, in an article titled TV show will explore ‘haunted’ home that drove man from Norwich.

If you want to see that actual Norwich site, remember it’s a private residence. Be discreet and respectful of their privacy.

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Exploring ley lines

The proximity of those two haunted locations makes it easy to draw a line between the two sites. In fact, any time I see two paranormal sites – especially haunted sites – near each other, I draw a line that connects them.

Then, I extend that line in both directions, and see where it leads me.

After reading about those two Connecticut haunts, I was eager to get to work. I’ve never been to Norwich, so I wasn’t sure what I’d find, but my “gut feeling” told me I’d find some great haunted places, nearby.

First, using Google Maps, I constructed a line from 3 Boswell Avenue to the Dr. Ashbell Woodward House Museum.

Then, I checked a few local landmarks that were on or near that line.

Immediately, I was drawn to Norwich’s Colonial Cemetery. That cemetery is closed, but the information online looks fascinating.

With three interesting haunts along one line, I knew I’d find more. So, I kept researching odd places close to the line.

Almost instantly, I found Norwich State Psychiatric Hospital, aka, Norwich State Hospital for the Insane. Several ghost hunters reported it as a terrifying place to investigate… when they could visit it.

As of 2016, this dangerous site – with demolished buildings and collapsed tunnels – is strictly off-limits and unsafe.





In addition, Norwich State Hospital looks like it’s over a mile away from the line.

Many researchers limit their ley lines widths to 12 feet. Others talk about lines as wide as 15 miles.

A few researchers insist that extreme weather, emerging fault lines, and other natural issues suggest that ley lines may be expanding, too.

Personally, I vary the width of the line with the location. That’s part common sense and part “gut feeling.”

In New Orleans’ French Quarter, the lines can be just a few feet wide. In other areas, I’ll expand them a few miles at the very most. My goal is to keep my lines as narrow and focused as possible.

So, I’m iffy about including Norwich State Hospital. If I had more time, I’d look for more ghost reports on or near the line. I’d judge the line width based on how many sites are nearby.

I might try some line variations, using the hospital as a starting point. That site’s ghost stories are certainly lurid.

But, at the moment, I’m not sure. And, I’m working on my next book. So, I’ll leave this ley line for others to explore and refine.

Nevertheless, this shows you how I use news stories and maps – plus some online research – to find and evaluate other sites that could be haunted.

Using Ley Lines to Find Haunted Places

Ley lines for ghost hunters - the upcoming bookYou can find haunted places with ley lines. I’ve been using ley lines for many years.

Drawn correctly, they’re reliable for paranormal research.

Ley lines aren’t new. Alfred Watkins coined the term in 1921. He’d observed the lines in England, forming paths between certain types of locations.

My way of using them is, umm, a little different. (It’s okay to call this pseudoscience, if you like. I won’t be offended; I know this works.)

For me, it’s a way to located overlooked (and under-reported) paranormal sites… with about 80% accuracy.

It’s a little difficult to explain what I do. That’s why I’m working on a second edition of my related book.

How I Use Ley Lines to Find Paranormal Sites

This is a ridiculously brief summary, but it may be enough to help you test-drive ley lines in your area.

First, I research all the weird things that happen in or near a known haunted (or creepy) location.

I keep researching, as long as I keep finding things that make me pause and mutter, “Wow, that’s bizarre.”

It could be a ghost story, a Bigfoot sighting, or a UFO report. It might be a Guinness Book event, or a crime that’s truly out-of-place for that locale.

If it’s weird, I add it to my list.

Sometimes, my research covers hundreds of miles. And, I put a dot on the map for each and every story or event that I find.

And then I take out a ruler, and see which dots align.

Connecting the Dots… sort of

Though I call it “connecting the dots,” there’s more to it. I’m also looking for repeating patterns – dates, times of day, names, or whatever is most quirky about whatever-it-is.

History and geography are big components, but so is intuition.

The latter is the most difficult to explain in text… here or in a book.

Talking about this to audiences hasn’t been much easier. But, when I show one of my maps, it can make more sense.

The fact is: some of my maps are so accurate, I’ve been able to predict – within feet – where people will report something ghostly. And, I can do that even if I’ve never visited the site.

My History with Ley Lines

Since the 1990s, I’ve used ley lines to improve my ghost hunting results, and when I’ve scouted locations for TV shows.

My research is unique.

Back around 1997, when I first noticed connections between some haunted sites, I contacted ley line researchers like Paul Devereux.

Each said no one else had considered using ley lines for ghost hunting.

After exchanging a few letters with Mr. Devereux – the leading expert at the time – I could tell he was somewhat skeptical.

That’s okay. A lot of people don’t believe in ghosts, so I could hardly expect anyone to believe in ghosts and their relationship to ley lines.

Since then, this has been an extraordinary adventure.

My ley lines have been reliable, from paranormal reports in the White Mountains of NH to haunted sites in Salem, Massachusetts, and from ghosts of New Orleans’ French Quarter to UFOs in Quebec, Canada.

I still use ley lines in my research, and it’s still working for me.

The Book

Even before I could get the facts into people’s hands, word spread about my research.

So, in 2012, I threw some of my notes together as a book.

Oops.  That wasn’t one of my better ideas. In my haste, I left too many questions unanswered.

Apparently, crafting ley lines – for ghost hunting, anyway – is a more intuitive process than I’d realized.

People complained that the book wasn’t thorough enough.

When I took a fresh look at my book, I knew they were right.

I quickly withdrew it from publication.

For the past several years, I’ve been working on a complete overhaul of that text, with lots of additional maps to show how this works.

As of late 2020: Though other projects keep getting in the way, I really do plan to release my ley lines book in the near future.

Read Next

humorous ghost divider

Here’s my book information:

Ley Lines for Ghost Hunters, by Fiona Broome (2nd edition in progress)

With a list of local haunts, a map, and a ruler, you can determine the best locations for paranormal research… even haunted places no one talks about.

In this book, I’ll show you how to find ley lines (sometimes called “energy lines”) that seem to connect paranormal, sacred, and unusual sites.

Book ETA: 2021 (Really. I mean it, this time. I’d previously aimed for 2020, but we all know how that year went. Getting out and about, to gather data and confirm locations…? Nearly impossible. Fingers crossed, 2021 will be better.)

Salem’s Haunted ‘Judges’ Line’ – Map

The Judges’ Line of Salem, Massachusetts, by Fiona Broome

Seven Gables House- Salem, MAPatterns emerge when we study profoundly haunted areas. Consistent patterns may indicate energy paths. We can use those patterns to find and confirm haunted places.

In my 2007 book, The Ghosts of Austin, Texas, I talked about two major patterns connecting almost all hauntings in downtown Austin.

In Salem, Massachusetts, I’ve found different kinds of patterns.

One pattern follows intriguing lines. I’m not sure how other researchers overlooked these eerie connections that leave ghostly tracks across Salem and Boston’s North Shore. However, paranormal patterns are among my specialties, and Salem’s landscape confirms these connections between scenes of violence (and ghostly energy).

I’m calling one of these lines “The Judges’ Line.” It seems to be a ley line.

[Ley lines are lines or paths that connect sites with unusual energy. They could be major churches or temples, sites of violence and tragedy, or have some other unusual connection. Some speculate that energy flows along those paths, and the energy was there even before the church was built or the violence occurred. That energy may magnify the emotions or affect the thinking of people when they are on or near a ley line.]

Oddly, when I map the significant homes and businesses related to the judicial side of the Salem Witch Trials, they follow a line. Even stranger, that line also indicates where modern-day Salem judges have purchased homes.

The line extends directly to Gallows Hill Park, the most likely site of the 1692 hangings during the Salem Witch Trials.

Here’s what the line looks like, related to the entire Salem, Massachusetts area:

Judges' Line, Salem, MA

 

In most cases, this line is ruler-straight, and it’s feet wide, not miles.

Here is a peek at my preliminary, hand drawn map of the main locations:

Salem - Judges' Line map - ghosts and haunted places

 

Here are my notes. Numbers represent sites related to accusers. Letters are related to victims of the trials.

1. Chestnut Street (represented by a heavy black line) – Many modern-day judges and elected officials choose this street for their homes.

2. Judge Corwin’s home, also known as “Witch House” since he condemned so many witches during the Salem Witch Trials. The house’s original location was closer to the line. Later residents moved it.

3. Judge Hathorne’s home, also associated with the Salem Witch Trials. (Nathaniel Hawthorne changed the spelling of his own name to avoid any association with this ancestor.)

4. Sheriff George Corwin’s home – George Corwin was the son of the judge (#2) and benefited by seizing the property of convicted and admitted witches.

5. The home of Samuel Shattuck, whose testimony helped convict Bridget Bishop, one of the first Witch Trial victims.

6. The home of Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Governor Simon Bradstreet (1603 – 1697).

7. John Higginson Jr. lived here. He was the local magistrate. The Hawthorne Hotel was later built on this property.

8. Jacob Manning, a blacksmith, forged the shackles worn by many Witch Trial victims.

9. Thomas Beadle’s tavern, where Witch Trial inquests were held.

A. The home of Bridget Bishop, a Witch Trial victim who may be among the ghosts at the Lyceum Restaurant, now on that site.

B. Ann Pudeator, a Witch Trial victim whose specter was seen walking along Salem Common, even before her execution.

C. The home of John and Mary English, one of the wealthiest families in Colonial Salem. They were accused but escaped to New York.

D. Alice Parker’s home, owned by John and Mary English. Ms. Parker was accused of witchcraft and put to death.

The slightly triangular area near 7 and B represents Salem Common.

Gallows Hill Park is indicated on the far left side of the map. The “Judges Line” — generally indicated in yellow — points directly to it.

The small green areas near points 6, 7 and 8 represent sites with paranormal activity or they are scenes of violence in the 19th and 20th century… or both.

As I continue my research, I’m finding even more sites that will be represented with red dots. Most of them are along the Judges Line.

It’s a little chilling. I wonder why these people felt so drawn to this particular energy path.

Return to the Spalding Inn (2013)

Return to the Spalding Inn - ghosts 2013In April 2013, I visited the Spalding Inn for a ghost hunting event hosted by Jason Hawes.

It had been about two years since I’d last investigated the hotel.

Frankly, my earliest overnight visit to the hotel – in 2008, before the hotel opened – was alarming. Whatever I encountered there, it wasn’t just ghosts.

I’m in my comfort zone with ghostly phenomena. When weird things happen that I don’t understand, I get anxious.

So, I generally visited Jason & Grant and their families during the daytime. I liked sitting on the hotel porch, laughing and chatting about our adventures.

Then, in 2013, knowing that my husband and I were moving soon, I went back to the Spalding Inn to participate in one of Jason’s ghost hunting events.

Things had changed… really changed.

The ghostly energy confirmed what I’d discovered with my NH ley line map, shown later in this article.

But before I explain the ley line map, here’s what happened during my 2013 investigation.

My April 2013 report

The upper floor of the Spalding Inn’s carriage house seemed just as strange, but more had focused energy.

That is, many of us (including me) didn’t encounter the usual off-the-wall weird energy there.

It was… well, the word I’d use is “tidier.”

It was as if whatever’s there had a purpose for being there. 

If you weren’t useful to the ghost, and whatever his or her goal was, the ghost wasn’t around.

However, some investigators experienced profound encounters and spiritual confirmations.

Those seemed to be very quirky – and somewhat conflicted – experiences.

The “hottest” areas were in and near rooms 15 and 17.

Also, the spirits (ghosts, energy, whatever) at the main level (ground floor) of the Spalding Inn’s carriage house were far more responsive to the various electronic devices in use.

Kris was eager to talk about the ghosts

During that 2013 visit, Jason Hawes’ wife, Kris, shared many stories.  They were fascinating, because she was describing encounters that complemented mine.

Generally, Kris seemed more eager to talk about the hotel’s ghosts than Jason was.

But, I appreciated Jason’s decision to say less. As a high-profile ghost hunter, he needed to remain as objective as possible. Or perhaps he didn’t want to prompt visitors, but let them make their own ghostly discoveries.

What happened in 2008

I’d visited the hotel late in 2008. That was immediately after the Ghost Hunters International team investigated, but before the hotel was officially opened.

At the time, I preferred to keep a low profile. Another guest at the hotel was eager to claim the spotlight, and I was happy to let him do so.

In general, I’m fairly shy, especially in a predominantly male setting.

Also, unless asked for details, I usually keep many of my observations to myself. I like to think about them for a few days.

That gives me time to evaluate my experiences, away from the turbulence of the hauntings.

So, I didn’t talk much about what I’d seen and felt at the hotel. It included:

  • An apparition in the coach house
  • An astonishing collection of dead flies in another room in that building
  • And a voice – heard aloud – that mimicked me.

Then there was the figure that was dragging itself along the floor in the main building. And the haunted mirror on the first floor. And finally – back in the coach house – the completely unplugged old-school phone with the “call waiting” light blinking.

So, yes, what I’d witnessed in 2008 was very weird. I just didn’t say much about it at the time.

I may write more about this, later.

Oh, I slept soundly at the hotel. But what I witnessed during my investigations…? It was one of the strangest combination of phenomena I’ve ever encountered.

Then, Kris Hawes described what she’d seen

Five years later – in 2013 – Kris Hawes confirmed many of my experiences, without knowing about them ahead of time. After all, I’d never said much about them.

I was delighted. (And a little creeped-out, if I’m honest, especially about the unattractive figure crawling on the floor.)

As of 2013, it seemed like the ghosts were learning from visitors. The ghosts’ responses were more specific, more consistent, and involve more senses.

In other words, the Spalding Inn had become a more useful research location.

Paranormal “hot spots” at the Spalding Inn

In 2013, in the main building, the dining room felt like more of a “safe haven” from intrusive ghosts.

That was a relief. We could get away from the entities… whatever they were.

But, the perimeter pf the dining room was odd. It was like walking through spiritual jello, if that makes sense.

The extended corridor (where the sleeping rooms are) was far more active than it had been.

Previously, I’d categorized most of the activity there as fae and perhaps Native American, not ghostly.

Now, several ghosts in that hallway – and sleeping rooms along it – seemed interested in contacting us.

(I’m not sure what words to use for that. Maybe those ghosts were there all along, but fairly silent. Maybe they’d migrated to that part of the hotel, where they had a bigger audience. I have no idea.)

It was time to sell the hotel

As we chatted in 2013, Kris confided that Jason and Grant were thinking of selling the hotel.

The hotel’s massive repairs had cost far more than Grant and Jason had expected. Competing with neighboring hotels – that offered more amenities for seasonal tourists – was a challenge.

And, I think Jason and Grant had started out with a different vision for the hotel.

I told Kris that selling the hotel was a good idea.

I did not tell her that – during that 2013 investigation – the energy at the hotel seemed angry.

It was a somewhat nasty, drain-everything-from-you kind of energy.

This wasn’t just a spiritual attack.

I had no doubt the malicious energy wanted to destroy the hotel’s business, crush morale, and generally tear things up.

I was happy not to spend another night there.

Why did the energy change?

Maybe the ghosts didn’t like the idea of dealing with yet another set of owners.

Or maybe the ghosts had enjoyed the attention of Jason & Grant’s ghost hunting overnights.

I’m glad Jason & Grant and their families sold the hotel. I wish the new owners very good luck with it.

And yes, I’d cheerfully return there, out of curiosity. I’d love to see if the ghosts and other entities remained there.

My northern New Hampshire ley lines map

NH ley lines mapFor the 2013 event, I’d created a special information sheet that featured ley lines at and near the Spalding Inn. It also showed “hot spots” in northern New Hampshire in general.

The illustration is at right. If you draw these lines on a larger map, you can see where they extend into other states. All locations along the lines are worth exploring.

The ghost figures indicate locations where ghosts have been reported. The star-in-circle marks indicate other paranormal reports (UFOs, etc.) and anomalies.

If you’re researching in NH, check sites on either line.

Choose the northern one if you’re interested in ghosts. Choose the southern one if you’re eager to find Bigfoot (yes, there are reports along that line) or want to see UFOs.

Portland, Maine – Bailey Cemetery’s Ghosts

Bailey Cemetery - daytimeBailey Cemetery in Portland, Maine has all the ingredients of a good, haunted cemetery. It has Colonial history, unmarked graves, and some neglected plots.

The location is great for Portland ghost enthusiasts who prefer sites that can be reached on foot or via Metro. (That’s local public transportation.)

Unfortunately, the cemetery’s location also makes it less desirable for research: It’s on a busy street and next to an active fire station.

All in all, I recommend this site for casual, repeated research. It’s the kind of location that tends to become more clearly haunted with repeated visits.

Sites like these tend to respond well to familiar visitors. In my opinion, the energy appears to organize itself and increase when the spirits realize that they’re getting attention.

[The area around Bailey Cemetery was recommended by Danielle of Portland, Maine.]

AT DUSK

A couple of us investigated this site. Our first visit was at dusk. The site has a slightly eerie feeling, but nothing truly scary.

Two gravestones with pointing fingers reminded us of the legendary grave of Abel Blood, so we took a few photos. The results were surprising.

The first photo revealed no orbs, just a few reflections.

Bailey Cemetery, no orbs

The second photo included several.

Bailey Cemetery - orbs

I’d usually dismiss orbs in photos with obvious lights in the background. I’d also check humidity levels when we see so many orbs — just to rule out moisture — but it was a very dry evening.

Despite those factors, these two photos — taken just seconds apart — show such dramatic anomalies, I’m intrigued.

DAYTIME RESEARCH

We returned the next day for additional research. These were our results:

Unmarked graves – Numerous irregularities in the cemetery suggest unmarked graves (depressions) and unmarked plots (raised beds) throughout the cemetery.

For further study: Burial records for Bailey Cemetery are maintained at Evergreen Cemetery, 672 Stevens Avenue, Portland, Maine 04101 – 207-797-4597

Compass anomalies – Needle swings in excess of 20 degrees throughout the cemetery.

Charles Howard headstoneDowsing rods – Several areas indicate energy surges. One followed a line, suggesting an underground spring. (Buried power lines are also possible, and indicated by a sign at the cemetery, but unlikely less than a foot from older graves.)

We noted the most consistent reaction about six feet north of the small headstone of Charles Howard. (That stone is more than halfway back in the cemetery, and towards the middle.)

Charles Howard headstone - details

Location: Bailey Cemetery on Forest Avenue (Rte. 302)
between Newton Street and Farnham Street (East of I-95)
Portland, Maine

Nearest parking: About half a block east on Forest Avenue.

Location, for GPS –

Degrees Minutes Seconds:
Latitude: 434149N
Longitude: 0701831W

Decimal Degrees:
Latitude: 43.69694
Longitude: -70.30861