Ley Lines for Ghost Hunters

Ley lines for ghost hunters - the upcoming bookI use ley lines for ghost hunting. It’s how I discover haunted places that others overlook.

It’s a little difficult to explain, and that’s why I’m working on a second edition of my related book.

This one will include more information and more maps.

I’m hoping a picture (or a map) really is worth a 1000 words.

Here’s the TL:DR version…

I research all the weird things that happen in or near a known haunted (or creepy) location.

I keep researching, as long as I keep finding things that make me pause and mutter, “Wow, that’s bizarre.”

It could be a ghost story, a Bigfoot sighting, or a UFO report. It might be a Guinness Book event, or a crime that’s truly out-of-place for that locale. If it’s weird, I add it to my list.

Sometimes, my research covers hundreds of miles. And, I put a dot on the map for each and every story or event that I find.

And then I take out a ruler, and see which dots align.

Connecting the Dots… sort of

Though I call it “connecting the dots,” there’s more to it. I’m also looking for repeating patterns – dates, times of day, names, or whatever is most quirky about whatever-it-is.

History and geography are big components, but so is intuition.

The latter is the most difficult to explain in text… whether it’s here or in a book.

Talking about this to audiences hasn’t been much easier. But, when I show one of my maps, it can make more sense.

The fact is: some of my maps are so accurate, I’ve been able to predict – within feet – where people will report something ghostly. And, I can do that even if I’ve never visited the site.

History

Since the 1990s, I’ve studied ley lines to improve ghost hunting results.

My research is unique.

When I first noticed the alignment of some haunted sites, I contacted ley line researchers like Paul Devereux.

At that point, it looked like no one else had considered using ley lines for ghost hunting.

No one I contacted had heard of that use, anyway.

Since then, this has been an extraordinary adventure. My ley lines have been reliable, from paranormal reports in the White Mountains of NH to haunted sites in Salem, Massachusetts, and from ghosts of New Orleans’ French Quarter to UFOs in Quebec, Canada.

However, even before I could get the facts into people’s hands, word spread about my research.

So, in 2012, I threw some of my notes together as a book.

Oops.

That wasn’t one of my better ideas. In my haste, I left too many questions unanswered.

What I do…? Apparently, it’s a more intuitive process than I’d realized. People complained that the book wasn’t thorough enough.

And, re-reading it from their perspective, they were right.

I quickly withdrew it from publication.

What’s Next

I’m working on a complete overhaul of that text, with a lot of additional maps to show how this works. I hope to publish the book soon.

It will be released with lots of supporting media and materials, to make ley lines useful for paranormal researchers in all fields.

As of late 2018, the book is nearly complete, and I’m editing it.

Read Next: 

humorous ghost divider

Here’s my book information:

Ley Lines for Ghost Hunters, by Fiona Broome (2nd edition in progress)

With a list of local haunts, a map, and a ruler, you can determine the best locations for paranormal research… even haunted places no one talks about.

In this book, I’ll show you how to find ley lines (sometimes called “energy lines”) that seem to connect paranormal, sacred, and unusual sites.

Book ETA: 2019 (Really. I mean it, this time. 2019 is my year to stay focused on my books, even if that means ignoring the Mandela Effect and everything else.)

Salem’s Haunted ‘Judges’ Line’ – Map

The Judges’ Line of Salem, Massachusetts, by Fiona Broome

Seven Gables House- Salem, MAPatterns emerge when we study profoundly haunted areas. Consistent patterns may indicate energy paths. We can use those patterns to find and confirm haunted places.

In my 2007 book, The Ghosts of Austin, Texas, I talked about two major patterns connecting almost all hauntings in downtown Austin.

In Salem, Massachusetts, I’ve found different kinds of patterns.

One pattern follows intriguing lines. I’m not sure how other researchers overlooked these eerie connections that leave ghostly tracks across Salem and Boston’s North Shore. However, paranormal patterns are among my specialties, and Salem’s landscape confirms these connections between scenes of violence (and ghostly energy).

I’m calling one of these lines “The Judges’ Line.” It seems to be a ley line.

[Ley lines are lines or paths that connect sites with unusual energy. They could be major churches or temples, sites of violence and tragedy, or have some other unusual connection. Some speculate that energy flows along those paths, and the energy was there even before the church was built or the violence occurred. That energy may magnify the emotions or affect the thinking of people when they are on or near a ley line.]

Oddly, when I map the significant homes and businesses related to the judicial side of the Salem Witch Trials, they follow a line. Even stranger, that line also indicates where modern-day Salem judges have purchased homes.

The line extends directly to Gallows Hill Park, the most likely site of the 1692 hangings during the Salem Witch Trials.

Here’s what the line looks like, related to the entire Salem, Massachusetts area:

Judges' Line, Salem, MA

 

In most cases, this line is ruler-straight, and it’s feet wide, not miles.

Here is a peek at my preliminary, hand drawn map of the main locations:

Salem - Judges' Line map - ghosts and haunted places

 

Here are my notes. Numbers represent sites related to accusers. Letters are related to victims of the trials.

1. Chestnut Street (represented by a heavy black line) – Many modern-day judges and elected officials choose this street for their homes.

2. Judge Corwin’s home, also known as “Witch House” since he condemned so many witches during the Salem Witch Trials. The house’s original location was closer to the line. Later residents moved it.

3. Judge Hathorne’s home, also associated with the Salem Witch Trials. (Nathaniel Hawthorne changed the spelling of his own name to avoid any association with this ancestor.)

4. Sheriff George Corwin’s home – George Corwin was the son of the judge (#2) and benefited by seizing the property of convicted and admitted witches.

5. The home of Samuel Shattuck, whose testimony helped convict Bridget Bishop, one of the first Witch Trial victims.

6. The home of Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Governor Simon Bradstreet (1603 – 1697).

7. John Higginson Jr. lived here. He was the local magistrate. The Hawthorne Hotel was later built on this property.

8. Jacob Manning, a blacksmith, forged the shackles worn by many Witch Trial victims.

9. Thomas Beadle’s tavern, where Witch Trial inquests were held.

A. The home of Bridget Bishop, a Witch Trial victim who may be among the ghosts at the Lyceum Restaurant, now on that site.

B. Ann Pudeator, a Witch Trial victim whose specter was seen walking along Salem Common, even before her execution.

C. The home of John and Mary English, one of the wealthiest families in Colonial Salem. They were accused but escaped to New York.

D. Alice Parker’s home, owned by John and Mary English. Ms. Parker was accused of witchcraft and put to death.

The slightly triangular area near 7 and B represents Salem Common.

Gallows Hill Park is indicated on the far left side of the map. The “Judges Line” — generally indicated in yellow — points directly to it.

The small green areas near points 6, 7 and 8 represent sites with paranormal activity or they are scenes of violence in the 19th and 20th century… or both.

As I continue my research, I’m finding even more sites that will be represented with red dots. Most of them are along the Judges Line.

It’s a little chilling. I wonder why these people felt so drawn to this particular energy path.

Return to the Spalding Inn (2013)

Return to the Spalding Inn - ghosts 2013In April 2013, I visited the Spalding Inn for a ghost hunting event hosted by Jason Hawes.

It had been about two years since I’d last investigated the hotel.

Frankly, my earliest overnight visit to the hotel – in 2008, before the hotel opened – was alarming. Whatever I encountered there, it wasn’t just ghosts.

I’m in my comfort zone with ghostly phenomena. When weird things happen that I don’t understand, I get anxious.

So, I generally visited Jason & Grant and their families during the daytime. I liked sitting on the hotel porch, laughing and chatting about our adventures.

Then, in 2013, knowing that my husband and I were moving soon, I went back to the Spalding Inn to participate in one of Jason’s ghost hunting events.

Things had changed… really changed.

The ghostly energy confirmed what I’d discovered with my NH ley line map, shown later in this article.

But before I explain the ley line map, here’s what happened during my 2013 investigation.

My April 2013 Report

The upper floor of the Spalding Inn’s carriage house seemed just as strange, but more had focused energy.

That is, many of us (including me) didn’t encounter the usual off-the-wall weird energy there. It was… well, the word I’d use is “tidier.”

It was as if whatever’s there had a purpose for being there.  If you weren’t useful to the ghost, and whatever his or her goal was, the ghost wasn’t around.

However, some investigators experienced profound encounters and confirmations.

Those seemed to be very quirky – and somewhat conflicted – experiences.

The “hottest” areas were in and near rooms 15 and 17.

Also, the spirits (ghosts, energy, whatever) at the main level (ground floor) of the Spalding Inn’s carriage house were a lot more responsive to the various electronic devices in use.

During that 2013 visit, Jason Hawes’ wife, Kris, shared many stories.  They were fascinating, because she was describing encounters that complemented mine.

Generally, Kris seemed more eager to talk about the hotel’s ghosts than Jason was.

But, I appreciated Jason’s decision to say less. As a high-profile ghost hunter, he needed to remain as objective as possible. Or perhaps he didn’t want to prompt visitors, but let them make their own ghostly discoveries.

What Happened in 2008

I’d visited the hotel late in 2008. That was immediately after the Ghost Hunters International team investigated, but before the hotel was officially opened.

At the time, I preferred to keep a low profile. Another guest at the hotel was eager to claim the spotlight, and I was happy to let him do so.

In general, I’m fairly shy, especially in a predominantly male setting.

Also, unless asked for details, I usually keep many of my observations to myself. I like to think about them for a few days.

That gives me time to evaluate my experiences, away from the turbulence of the hauntings.

So, I didn’t talk much about what I’d seen and felt at the hotel. It included:

  • An apparition in the coach house
  • An astonishing collection of dead flies in another room in that building
  • And a voice – heard aloud – that mimicked me.

Then there was the figure that was dragging itself along the floor in the main building. And the haunted mirror on the first floor. And finally – back in the coach house – the completely unplugged old-school phone with the “call waiting” light blinking.

So, yes, what I’d witnessed in 2008 was very weird. I just didn’t say much about it at the time.

I may write more about this, later.

Oh, I slept soundly at the hotel. But what I witnessed during my investigations…? It was one of the strangest combination of phenomena I’ve ever encountered.

Then, Kris Hawes Described What She’d Seen

Five years later – in 2013 – Kris Hawes confirmed many of my experiences, without knowing about them ahead of time. After all, I’d never said much about them.

I was delighted. (And a little creeped-out, if I’m honest, especially about the unattractive figure crawling on the floor.)

As of 2013, it seemed like the ghosts were learning from visitors. The ghosts’ responses were more specific, more consistent, and involve more senses.

In other words, the Spalding Inn had become a more useful research location.

Anomalous Areas in the Spalding

In 2013, in the main building, the dining room felt like more of a “safe haven” from intrusive ghosts. We could get away from them.

But, the perimeter was odd. It was like walking through spiritual jello, if that makes sense.

The extended corridor (where the sleeping rooms are) was far more active than it had been.

Previously, I’d categorized most of the activity there as fae and perhaps Native American.

Now, several ghosts seemed to increase their presence there.

(I’m not sure what words to use for that. Maybe those ghosts were there all along, but fairly silent. Maybe they’d migrated to that part of the hotel, where they had a bigger audience. I have no idea.)

It Was a Good Time to Sell the Hotel

As we chatted in 2013, Kris confided that Jason and Grant were thinking of selling the hotel. I told her that was a good idea.

I did not tell her that – during that 2013 investigation – the energy at the hotel seemed angry.

It was a somewhat nasty, drain-everything-from-you kind of energy. Not just a spiritual attack, but I had no doubt the malicious energy wanted to destroy the hotel’s business, crush morale, and generally tear things up.

I was happy not to be spending the night there.

Maybe the ghosts didn’t like the idea of dealing with yet another set of owners. Or maybe the ghosts had enjoyed the attention of Jason & Grant’s ghost hunting overnights.

I’m glad Jason & Grant and their families sold the hotel. I wish the new owners very good luck with it.

My Northern NH Ley Line Map

NH ley lines mapFor the 2013 event, I’d created a special information sheet that featured ley lines at and near the Spalding Inn, and northern New Hampshire in general.

The illustration is at right. If you draw these lines on a larger map, you can see where they extend into other states. All locations along the lines are worth exploring.

The ghost figures indicate locations where ghosts have been reported. The star-in-circle marks indicate other paranormal reports (UFOs, etc.) and anomalies.

If you’re researching in NH, check sites on either line.

Choose the northern one if you’re interested in ghosts. Choose the southern one if you’re eager to find Bigfoot (yes, there are reports along that line) or want to see UFOs.