Stormy Weather and Ghost Hunting

It was a dark and stormy night.Stormy Weather and Ghost Hunting

That’s a famous line used seriously – and sometimes comically – in different contexts.

But, for ghost enthusiasts, it can trigger a few deliciously eerie images of haunted places and the spirits they harbor.

Of course, few of us are foolish enough to investigate outdoors during thunderstorms. Between the soaking rain and risks of lightning strikes, it’s better to ghost hunt indoors.

However, a recent article raised a few questions worth considering.

Is there a connection between ghostly phenomena and weather? It may not be “just in your mind.”

Here’s part of the article,   A Dark and Stormy Night: Does Weather Affect the Paranormal?

The idea is not entirely far-fetched. After all, if ghosts, spirits, and other such entities do exist, then they must use some form of energy…

For example, it is thought that ghosts sometimes utilize the ambient heat in a room for energy to manifest, leading to cold spots as this energy is abruptly absorbed.

…There are various types of atmospheric activity that could possibly affect the paranormal activity of a location, with the most common image of this being thunderstorms, so how would these storms be able to exert an influence on supernatural entities?

…Perhaps the biggest factor is simply the sheer amount of electrical and electro-magnetic energy charging the air during storms.

That’s an interesting theory. I’m eager to hear if anyone has first-person experience with stormy weather increasing ghostly activity.

That same article raises other questions about other atmospheric conditions, too:

…A good example would be solar activity from our sun, which sometimes releases solar flares that set loose X-Rays, intense doses of UV radiation, and create what is called “solar wind.” This solar wind is composed of highly charged plasma particles that can lash out to reach all the way to Earth, where it’s electromagnetic energy is powerful enough to cause disruptions in the planet’s magnetic field called geomagnetic storms.

If you’d like to compare investigation results and solar activity and geomagnetic storms, NOAA offers Alerts, Watches, and Warnings. (I prefer the visual displays on the NOAA homepage.)

Then, the article continues with skeptical notes:

… it is also important to look at other natural explanations for why the weather might produce more reported paranormal activity. The most obvious one is that simply the spooky and rather ominous quality of storms… make for an atmosphere in which people more susceptible to perceiving perfectly mundane things for being supernatural.

I agree, especially if an investigator is new to paranormal research, or is feeling unusually stressed. “Dude, run!” moments can happen to anyone. It’s really embarrassing when the cause is debunked.

The following, one-minute video doesn’t claim to show a ghost, but the face-like image in the clouds is fun.

https://youtu.be/BwTOU8HAZX8

Finally, the storms article delves into the topic of infrasound, as well. It’s a topic worth considering, and something I check before any investigation.

Paranormal activity witnessed during storms may also be caused by phenomena other than the supernatural. The most obvious example would be ultra-low frequency sound waves, called infrasound.

But, ruling out the emotional impact of storms and infrasound, I’m very interested in any connections between thunderstorms, geomagnetic storms, solar flares, and surges in paranormal activity.

Also, has anyone noticed an increase in psychic activity (your own or others’) during extreme weather?

I’ll admit that – aside from dashing between the car and the investigation site, dodging rain, snow, or sleet – I’ve rarely paid much attention to the weather.

If you’ve experienced anything connecting paranormal activity and weather, I hope you’ll leave a comment to share your insights.

Source

Read the full article here – A Dark and Stormy Night: Does Weather Affect the Paranormal?

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