[NH] Hollis – Blood cemetery – Just a bug?

This was my second visit to Blood Cemetery (aka Pine Hill Cemetery). I was there just before dusk on Sunday, 17 Oct 1999.

According to ghost hunting tradition, the more time you spend in a “haunted” location, the more likely it is that you’ll go home with ghost photos. These generally include “ghost orbs,” but sometimes other haunted images show up in ghost hunters’ photos.

This was my second visit to Blood Cemetery during one day. These photos were taken with a 35mm film camera. I was taking “ghost pictures” near Abel Blood’s famous headstone , and around the Farley family graves.

bl-2no

About 30 seconds after taking the photo shown above, I thought a possible ghost orb appeared in the next photo. It’s at the far left of the photo, near the top.

bl-2nd

That white orb-shape is too small to be a fingerprint of someone at the photo lab, and the negative had no marks on it.

I was fairly certain there were no insects flying on that chilly night. There was nothing to reflect light at my lens. Among 24 photos taken that evening, this was the only photo with an orb.

However, after reviewing this photo several years (and several thousand photos) later, I think that an out-of-season, disoriented bug flew past me. Most “ghost orbs” are perfectly round.

When one isn’t, there’s usually a good, normal explanation for it.

Though the moment had that “anomaly” feeling to it, I’m at least 99.9% sure the orb-like shape is a flying insect.

(And, for all I know, the real anomaly was going on in a nearby part of the cemetery. It’s another reason to investigate with a team, so the area is well covered, and nothing interesting is missed.)

[ME] York – Mary Nasson’s grave

At left: The haunted “Witch’s Grave” of York, Maine / Mary Nasson (1745 – 1774)

On 17 Oct 1999, I visited the Old Burying Yard on Rte. 1a in York Harbor, Maine. It’s a small cemetery on the side of the road nearest the water, slightly west of the downtown area. You can park in town and walk back to it.

On this day, I was searching for the grave of witch “Mary Miller Jason.” That was the name reported in at least one book about the ghosts of Maine, and at several websites.

Instead, I found a grave that matched the book’s description, but the woman was Mary Nasson, wife of Samuel Nasson.

(I’m fairly certain that the “Jason” spelling was originally a typo that spread as one resource copied another.  There’s a lesson in this: Double-check all resources, and don’t trust websites or books — even mine — until you’ve verified their research, yourself.)

I took several photos to document this grave, since — at that time — I was the only one who’d spotted the misspelled name. (Since then, others have used my website as a resource and corrected the spelling when writing about Mrs. Nasson.)

Footstone at Mary Nasson's grave
Footstone inscription at Mary Nasson’s grave.

According to reports, Mrs. Nasson had been a successful and respected herbalist in the community, and she was also skilled at performing exorcisms.

Her portrait supposedly adorns the top of the headstone, shown below. (I’m not sure if that’s a tiny orb at the upper left corner of the photo.)Mary Nasson's face

Mrs. Nasson’s grave is unique. Her husband erected a headstone and a footstone. As if those weren’t enough, he placed a heavy stone slab between them, covering the ground over her body.

Historians insist that Mr. Nasson placed the slab there to keep cattle from damaging the grave. However, earlier and later graves in this cemetery do not have that kind of “protection.”

The legend is that the stone was placed there to be sure she stayed in her grave.

I have difficulty believing that — if the cattle story is true — Mr. Nasson was the only person in York to care enough to protect a family member’s grave.

Mrs. Nasson’s grave is known as “Witch’s Grave,” and it is reported to be haunted.

Skeptical after the name was different from some published accounts, I put my hands on the stone slab covering the grave. Supposedly, the grave emits heat.

I’d expected some radiant heat from the sun. Instead, the stone covering her grave was dramatically warmer, only where it meets the headstone (the larger of the two grave markers).

That’s very odd.

The crows which frequent the cemetery in the summer are reported to be Mrs. Nasson’s “familiars,” still paying tribute to her. There were none when I visited in October, but I often saw the crows in the graveyard when I lived in York.

The inscription on the headstone:

Here liest quite free from Lifes
Distrefsing Care,
A loving Wife
A tender Parent dear
Cut down in midst of days
As you may see
But – stop – my Grief
I soon shall equal be
when death shall stop my breath
And end my Time
God grant my Dust
May mingle, then, with thine.

Sacred to the memory of Mrs. MARY NASSON, wife of Mr. SAMUEL NASSON, who departed this life Aug. 18th 1774, AEtat 29.

However, Mrs. Nasson’s grave isn’t the only eerie plot in the cemetery, nor the only reason why the cemetery may be haunted. For more information about the Old Burying Yard, see my other insights about York, Maine.