Ghost Hunting without Equipment

This is one of the first of my re-issued Hollow Hill podcasts.

Ghost Hunting podcast - Hollow HillIn this 16-minute podcast from November 2009, I talked about using your five (or six) senses to investigate haunted places. I also shared other ghost hunting tips.

Some things have changed in the eight years since I recorded this. (Okay, a lot has changed, but the info in this podcast is still valid, with a few notable exceptions.)

For example, as of 2017, the K-II isn’t the only good EMF meter.

EMF Ghost MeterIn fact, right now (late 2017) I like the Ghost Meter better than the K-II. (Also, the Ghost Meter costs about half as much as a K-II meter.) In “seance mode,” the Ghost Meter been surprisingly accurate for yes/no responses.

(That’s one in a photo on the right. Mine has a clear case, not black. And yes, it is an “as seen on TV” product. Despite that, it seems to work as a real-time communication device. I’d trust it far more than, say, a loosened flashlight/torch.)

Also, the Ovilus is available again. It’s far more sophisticated than it was in 2009. As of 2017, I’m testing its accuracy in a variety of on-site and remote experiments. So far, I can confirm that the Ovilus III can work remotely, with about 30% accuracy.

Other than that, most of this 2009 recording is still good information.

Yes, I still experience frustration when people miss seeing apparitions and other ghostly phenomena. But, since 2009, I’ve learned to accept that some researchers are going to hyper-focus on their ghost hunting equipment… and miss real hauntings.

Maybe this podcast will help. (It’s from HollowHillPodcasts.com.)

First, I talked about the importance of looking around and listening. I described the kinds of evidence you might see and hear.

Then, I shared an easy way to make your hands more sensitive to “cold spots” and exactly how to find them.

I also described the best ways to use dowsing rods, and whether or not you should investigate “lights out” at indoor locations. (In most cases, there’s not much reason to work in the dark, but there are exceptions.)

Related Links

Homemade Dowsing Rods – My article about how to make and use your own dowsing rods.

Joey Korn’s Dowsers.com – The only professional-grade dowsing rods I use.

Podcast by: Fiona Broome, the founder of HollowHill.com
Music: Zombie by Devin Anderson

Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context

Ghost hunting often puts us in touch with tragic events from the past. Emotions can influence how we interpret cues and events related to a haunting.

However, what we think is tragic today… it might not have been so horrific in the past.

Understanding history can be essential when you are trying to:

  • Understand the quirky things that seem to activate a residual energy haunting.
  • Identify a ghost, and the era he or she is from.
  • Figure out why the ghost remains here, and whether his (or her) story is true… and enough to trigger a haunting.
  • Put active sites into an historical context that makes sense.

That’s why I wrote Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context.  It’s a three-page report describes some harsh realities of the past.

It explains why many stories and grave markers that seem so tragic, today, may not tell the whole story or even the correct one.  Those hauntings might be related to a very different story.

This isn’t a cheerful report.  You may be shocked by some of the statistics.  But, to really understand ghosts and their stories, a glimpse into the past can be important.

Here’s my related podcast from 2012: Ghost Hunting and Historic Context

Here’s that report link: Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context

Baseline Yourself for Ghost Hunting

baseline yourself for ghost huntingLet’s say you’re ghost hunting.

Suddenly, you feel uncomfortable, ill, or emotional.

Are you sure that it’s something paranormal?

A simple, baseline check can help you decide what’s really going on.

That’s why I’ve recorded a short podcast, and created a transcript you can print.

I’ve also created a worksheet of emotions.

Use them yourself. Share them with your team and students, too.

  • The podcast provides an overview.
  • The instruction sheet covers the important points.
  • The worksheet can be carried with you, so — at a glance — you can tell how you feel before the investigation.
  • Then, during the investigation, it’s easy to check for (and identify) possible paranormal influences on your emotions.

The Baseline Yourself Podcast

Here’s the five-minute podcast:

How to Use This

Discover what’s normal for you.

Before each investigation, double-check your physical, mental, and emotional state.

By running a “baseline check” of yourself, you can be more confident when something odd happens at a haunted site.

The chart can help you evaluate external emotions — perhaps coming from a ghost — as well.

That’s essential for sensitives, psychics, and mediums.  Knowing what’s you and what’s not you… that helps you establish boundaries.

Free Downloads

Here’s the free Baseline Yourself PDF.

Print copies to share with your team members.  This approach may not suit everyone, but when it’s useful… it’s really useful.

Download the free PDF instructions and worksheet, here.
[https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0Q4gQP_1SklZHZxelBUeUdVaGc]

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Production credits: The illustrations were inspired by several different online charts of emotions. And, as usual, the podcast music is Zombie, by Devin Anderson.

This mini-podcast and PDF were from Day 1 of Fiona’s 13 Days of Halloween, 2012.