Mental Work, PK, and Poltergeist Activity

ghostbatPoltergeist activity… is it ghostly?

Four theories are popular:

  1. A ghost causes the objects to move.
  2. A ghost works in tandem with a living (and somewhat emotional) person. Their combined efforts remotely move objects.
  3. It’s a psychological issue, and PK (psychokinesis) probably comes from a living person.
  4. Poltergeist activity doesn’t exist, and it’s always a prank. (I’ve witnessed enough dramatic poltergeist activity to laugh at that idea.)
Mental Work?

In the near future, a research project called Mental Work may tell us more.

Here’s a YouTube video about it.

I prefer the explanation (and demonstration) in the Euronews report: http://www.euronews.com/2017/10/24/public-invited-to-show-off-the-power-of-their-minds

You can participate in this experiment in Switzerland. They’re hiring: Mental Work.

What this means to ghost hunters

Psychokinesis (PK) – also known as telekinesis – could explain some ghost phenomena.

  • Someone could cause poltergeist activity. (Most people connected with poltergeist activity have no idea they’re part of it.)
  • When we ask the ghost to move the child’s toy, knock on a wall, or slam a door, maybe someone living controls it.
  • Is some form of electromagnetic energy involved? That could trigger EMF spikes and affect devices such as the Ovilus.
  • Likewise, a living individual could create the on-off “communications” we attempt with loosened contacts in flashlights.

Of course, these “could” possibilities are more theory than hard science.

Meanwhile, avoid skeptics’ mistake of insisting that anything that can be faked (or explained in normal terms), always is.

I’m not sure where these studies will lead us. But, anything that clarifies what the mind can do – among the living or the dead – can help us better understand haunted places.

Tinnitus and Ghost Hunting

woman's ear with earring - listening
Is tinnitus sometimes related to paranormal activity?

This subject takes me far into the fringes of speculation. I know that, and no, I don’t take all of this as seriously as it may sound in text.

But, I do think we need to explore the “what if…?” questions, just in case.

So, here’s one theory: Like EMF spikes, tinnitus could be another marker, signaling a time or location (or both) where the “veil between the worlds” is thinner.

This could be a temporary opening or something more permanent.

I’m especially interested in whether changes in tinnitus — a persistent or irregular ringing in the ears, commonly affecting about 10% of the population — are just more indication of increase EMF, or distinct markers in themselves.

However, I’m not the only person to question whether tinnitus and EMF might be related. For example, people have been discussing the connection at sites such as Tinnitus Talk.

In fact, I may be fairly late to this party, as I’ve found a study that concludes, “Our data indicate that tinnitus is associated with subjective electromagnetic hypersensitivity.”

I’m very interested in what people notice about tinnitus in relation to all kinds of EMF variations, and all kinds of paranormal activity.

This includes perceived volume, pitch, duration, whether it’s predominantly in one ear or the other, and if a compass direction is involved.

I’m also looking for patterns in tinnitus changes, related to local time and sidereal time.

This is not about tinnitus cures, related medical symptoms, and so on. (Comments on those topics will not be approved. I can’t risk us wandering into “medical advice.” And, that’s far off-topic, anyway.)

My interest is fairly narrow, and focusing on any patterns related to paranormal activity and perceived tinnitus changes — before, during, or immediately after the event.

I’m also interested in tinnitus that increases at locations associated with sacred sites, ghosts, regular UFO sightings (I’m thinking of the Marfa Lights, etc.), and so on.

If you have some insights, I hope you’ll share them in comments at this website. Thanks!

Ghosts and Infrasound

Ghosts and Infrasound - ghost huntingMany researchers aren’t considering infrasound in their current paranormal research.

They should.

In my own studies, I’ve seen a high correlation between infrasound and certain types of paranormal reports.

It may be more than an explanation for some ghostly anomalies.

It may also be something we can use in our research.

Yes, I’m aware of equipment that generates infrasound. Some researchers (and at least one TV show) use it in their investigations.

The problem is the effect of infrasound on the investigators. Those low-level sound vibrations can cause people to feel anxiety or even hallucinate.

Here’s a Mythbusters test, from Episode 193 of their show. It makes some good points.

That 3-minute Mythbusters video is at: https://youtu.be/4wqvE_QYTk0

As that video shows, you can be affected, even if you don’t think you hear anything unusual.

That means noting underground streams, nearby highways, and bridges that might produce infrasound.

Of course, that leads us back to the tricky question: Just because ghostly phenomena can be explained by something normal, is that always the correct explanation?

If you’re using infrasound – or have noticed a correlation with haunted sites –  I hope you’ll share your thoughts & insights in comments, below.


Resources

If you’re new to infrasound and want to know more of the technical aspects, here a starting point: check this PDF: Infrasound and its affects on humans.

And, if you want to get very geeky about this, you may enjoy Vic Tandy’s theories, in this PDF.