Halloween Ghost Hunting Checklist

Halloween can be a whirlwind for many ghost hunters.  Events, parties, investigations… and then the big night itself.  Are you ready?

Ideally, Halloween research plans are prepared far ahead of Halloween night.  However, even if you’ve been too busy, it’s not too late to organize your Halloween plans for ghost hunting success.

To help you, I’m sharing my own Halloween checklist.  I’ve used some variation of this, every year for the past dozen or so years.  I hope it’s useful and helps you make the most of Halloween ghost hunting opportunities.

Click here for the Halloween Ghost Hunting Checklist (PDF)

Everyday Ghost Hunting (Report, Mindmap)

Every day can be a fresh opportunity for discovering ghosts and haunted places.  You don’t need to wait for a special event, or find the perfect haunted location in some out-of-the-way place.  You may pass by haunted sites every day, and not realize it.

That little park near your home, office, or school… why is it there, instead of somewhere else? Was there a specific reason it wasn’t used as a building site?

When you’re downtown, what about historical plaques and markers?  People pass them daily, and don’t even realize they’re there.  Many tell stories that could suggest a haunting.

Ghost Hunting in Tilton, NHIn quiet, downtown Tilton, NH, a plain white apartment building was once a hotel, and welcomed famous guests like Edison, Ford, and Firestone.  It had also been a rooming house for factory workers.

Though I found no ghost stories there, I wondered what other, unassuming sites might have equally colorful histories and have ghosts.

Researching a midwest site, I learned about a nearby, noted Native American mound. It had been reduced to a very small pile of dirt.  The rest of it had been used to fill nearby gardens and roadways.  Does it harbor residual energy, or even spirits that protect what’s left of it? (And did any of its spiritual energy transfer – with the soil – to the local gardens and roadways?)

These are the kinds of sites you might walk or drive past daily, and not think about as potential haunts.

In this report — and the accompanying mindmap — I share tips for including ghost hunting in your everyday routines.

Click here for the Everyday Ghost Hunting Report (PDF)

Click here for the Everyday Ghost Hunting Mindmap
(PDF for 8.5″ x 14″ paper)

Ghost Hunting Events – Get the Most from Them

Ghost hunting events can be great fun.  They can also be huge disappointments.

The difference can be how well you prepared for the event.

To get the most from a ghost hunting event, plan ahead.  Know exactly where you’re going, what to expect there, who’s speaking and leading investigations or tours, and the locations where you’re most likely to encounter a ghost.

Also prepare as if you’re going on a trip, even if the event is just across town.  Check your clothing, your equipment, your batteries, and so on.

I share my best suggestions in my report and worksheet, Ghost Hunting Events – Getting the Most from Them.  That’s a free, three-page PDF you can print and read, at home.

Looking for ghost hunting events?  Check some of these websites:

TAPS events

John Sabol’s Ghost Excavations

Troy Taylor’s American Hauntings Tours

Ghost Hunt Weekends

G.H.O.S.T.S. Annual events (CAN)

Fright Nights (UK)

Tudor World Ghost Vigils (UK)

Ghost Hunt Events (UK)

Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context

Ghost hunting often puts us in touch with tragic events from the past. Emotions can influence how we interpret cues and events related to a haunting.

However, what we think is tragic today… it might not have been so horrific in the past.

Understanding history can be essential when you are trying to:

  • Understand the quirky things that seem to activate a residual energy haunting.
  • Identify a ghost, and the era he or she is from.
  • Figure out why the ghost remains here, and whether his (or her) story is true… and enough to trigger a haunting.
  • Put active sites into an historical context that makes sense.

That’s why I wrote Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context.  It’s a three-page report describes some harsh realities of the past.

It explains why many stories and grave markers that seem so tragic, today, may not tell the whole story or even the correct one.  Those hauntings might be related to a very different story.

This isn’t a cheerful report.  You may be shocked by some of the statistics.  But, to really understand ghosts and their stories, a glimpse into the past can be important.

Here’s my related podcast from 2012: Ghost Hunting and Historic Context

Here’s that report link: Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context

Baseline Yourself for Ghost Hunting

baseline yourself for ghost huntingLet’s say you’re ghost hunting.

Suddenly, you feel uncomfortable, ill, or emotional.

Are you sure that it’s something paranormal?

A simple, baseline check can help you decide what’s really going on.

That’s why I’ve recorded a short podcast, and created a transcript you can print.

I’ve also created a worksheet of emotions.

Use them yourself. Share them with your team and students, too.

  • The podcast provides an overview.
  • The instruction sheet covers the important points.
  • The worksheet can be carried with you, so – at a glance – you can tell how you feel before the investigation.
  • Then, during the investigation, it’s easy to check for (and identify) possible paranormal influences on your emotions.

The Baseline Yourself Podcast

Here’s the five-minute podcast:

The podcast is available here, too: https://directory.libsyn.com/episode/index/id/2099479

How to Use This

Discover what’s normal for you.

Before each investigation, double-check your physical, mental, and emotional state.

By running a “baseline check” of yourself, you can be more confident when something odd happens at a haunted site.

The chart can help you evaluate external emotions – perhaps coming from a ghost – as well.

That’s essential for sensitives, psychics, and mediums.  Knowing what’s you and what’s not you… that helps you establish boundaries.

Free Downloads

Here’s the free Baseline Yourself PDF.

Print copies to share with your team members.  This approach may not suit everyone, but when it’s useful… it’s really useful.

Download the free PDF instructions and worksheet, here.
[https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B0Q4gQP_1SklZHZxelBUeUdVaGc]

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Production credits: The illustrations were inspired by several different online charts of emotions. And, as usual, the podcast music is Zombie, by Devin Anderson.

This mini-podcast and PDF were from Day 1 of Fiona’s 13 Days of Halloween, 2012.