Alternate Realities, Portals, and EMF Surges

creepy door openingEMF (or electromagnetic field/s) may be a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. That’s what Wikipedia says. That site also says “The electromagnetic field extends indefinitely throughout space and describes the electromagnetic interaction. It is one of the four fundamental forces of nature (the others are gravitation, weak interaction and strong interaction).”

Note: The relationship between EMF and gravitation could be important, since physics studies have raised many questions about gravity, such as whether it’s leaking into our world or out of it.

If gravity can leak across supposed brane barriers, why not EMF, as well?

Until recently, I’d been focusing on anomalous (unexplained) EMF surges at apparently haunted locations. Specifically, I’ve been studying EMF spikes noted on sensitive detection devices, where the EMF may be fleeting, not repeated (at that precise location, for some time), and without apparent origin.

Many ghost hunters enthusiastically claim that the EMF represents spiritual energy, or a “ghost.” (Likewise, they point to photographic anomalies and happily believe they’re pictures of actual ghosts. If that makes sense to them, I’m happy to agree.)

For years, I’ve been a contrarian. I’m not convinced that all EMF anomalies at haunted settings are actually spirits. (I maintain that attitude about all anomalies — including “ghost photos” — recorded at sites that might be haunted. I believe in ghosts. I believe that consistent anomalies occur at sites with a history of ghostly phenomena. I’m simply not sure that all anomalies (even at profoundly haunted sites) are caused by actual ghosts.

Here’s how I look at anomalies at haunted places:

 

ghosts and anomalies - venn diagram

I believe some EMF spikes occur when a door between realities opens, and — like gravity — electromagnetic energy leaks into our world. (One of my 2008 articles on this topic: EMF Reality Check – Are EMF Really Ghosts?)

I don’t want to spoil anyone’s happy investigations, if he or she is content to believe that the EMF spike on a K-II meter, Ovilus, or Ghost Meter Pro is actually Great-Aunt Harriet. For all I know, that particular encounter might represent spiritual energy from the beloved aunt.

However, I think that some EMF is leaking through portals (or access points between realities), and that these same points are where ghosts, faeries, and possibly Bigfoot or even UFOs are entering and exiting our world.

I’m not an expert in the latter two fields, and haven’t made up my mind about them, but I don’t want to leave out anything that might fit this theory. From a somewhat sci-fi perspective, it’s possible other civilizations have mastered use of these portals, and use them to visit other worlds. For all I know, it might save fuel or time, or both.

The Hum, mysterious booming sounds, and even EVP (electronic voice phenomena, sometimes believed to be voices “from the other side”) might come through.

Here’s what that Venn diagram looks like, as I imagine it:

realities venn diagram

 

And, those same points might be available for human transference, resulting in what I’ve described as the Mandela Effect, or cross-reality travel that results in alternate memories (history that doesn’t match this reality).

It’s a highly speculative theory. I’m not sure how likely any of this is.

However, I think it’s as good an explanation as any, related to EMF at paranormal locations, and I think it opens many avenues (no pun intended) for research into a variety of odd and paranormal phenomena.

Salem’s Haunted Judges Line – Map

The Salem Judges Line shows that patterns can predict paranormal activity.

In general, patterns emerge when I study profoundly haunted areas. I believe those patterns identify good locations for paranormal research.

In my 2007 book, The Ghosts of Austin, Texas, I talked about two major patterns connecting almost all hauntings in downtown Austin. (One of them relates to Shoal Creek. The other is connected to the Austin Ripper, America’s first serial killer.)

In Salem, Massachusetts, I’ve found different kinds of patterns.

Ley Lines in Salem

One pattern follows intriguing lines. I was the first to discover these ghostly tracks across Salem and Boston’s North Shore. There are several.

In Salem, each line suggests connections between scenes of violence… and possibly ghostly energy.

I’ve called one of these lines “The Judges’ Line.” It seems to be a ley line.

Ghost batLey lines are lines or paths that connect sites with unusual energy. They could be major churches or temples, sites of violence and tragedy, or another anomalous connection.

Some speculate that energy flows along those paths. In other words, the energy was there before the church was built or the violence occurred.

That energy may magnify the emotions — or affect the thinking — of people when they are on or near a ley line.

The Judge Connection

Oddly, when I map the significant homes and businesses related to the judicial side of the Salem Witch Trials, they follow a line.

Even stranger, that line also indicates where modern-day Salem judges have purchased homes.

The line extends directly to Gallows Hill Park, one of the most likely sites of the 1692 hangings during the Salem Witch Trials.

Here’s what this line looks like, related to the entire Salem, Massachusetts area:

Salem Judges Line

In many cases, this line is ruler-straight, and it’s feet wide, not miles.

Here’s my preliminary, hand drawn map of the main locations on the Salem Judges Line:

Salem Judges Line - details

The Salem Judges Line

All of the following points are related to the Salem Witch Trials.

  • Numbers represent sites related to accusers or the judicial system.
  • Letters are related to victims of the trials.

1. Chestnut Street (represented by a heavy black line) – Many judges and elected officials chose this street for their homes. Through the 21st century, they still do.

2. Judge Corwin’s home, also known as “Witch House” since he condemned so many witches during the Salem Witch Trials. The house’s original location was closer to the line. Later residents moved it.

3. Judge Hathorne’s home, also associated with the Salem Witch Trials. (Nathaniel Hawthorne changed the spelling of his name to avoid any association with this ancestor.)

4. Sheriff George Corwin’s home – George Corwin was the son of the judge (#2) and benefited by seizing the property of convicted and admitted witches.

5. The home of Samuel Shattuck, whose testimony helped convict Bridget Bishop, one of the first Witch Trial victims.

6. The home of Massachusetts Bay Colony’s Governor Simon Bradstreet (1603 – 1697).

7. John Higginson Jr. lived here. He was the local magistrate. The Hawthorne Hotel was later built on this property.

8. Jacob Manning, a blacksmith, forged the shackles worn by many Witch Trial victims.

9. Thomas Beadle’s tavern, where Witch Trial inquests were held.

A. The home of Bridget Bishop, a Witch Trial victim who may be among the ghosts at the Lyceum Restaurant, now on that site.

B. Ann Pudeator, a Witch Trial victim whose specter was seen walking along Salem Common, even before her execution.

C. The home of John and Mary English, one of the wealthiest families in Colonial Salem. They were accused but escaped to New York.

D. Alice Parker’s home, owned by John and Mary English. Ms. Parker was accused of witchcraft and put to death.

Other Salem Sites on the Line

The slightly triangular area near 7 and B represents Salem Common.

Gallows Hill Park is indicated on the far left side of the map. The “Judges Line” — generally indicated in yellow — points directly to it.

The small green areas near points 6, 7 and 8 represent sites with paranormal activity or they are scenes of violence in the 19th and 20th century… or both.

As I continue my research, I’m finding even more sites that will be represented with red dots. Most of them are along the Salem Judges Line.

It’s a little chilling. I wonder why these people felt so drawn to this particular energy path.

More articles about haunted Salem, Massachusetts

For more articles about Salem’s haunted places, visit EncounterGhosts.com for my Ghosts of Salem, Massachusetts article.

Eloise: The Asylum that Started It All

“Eloise: The Asylum That Started The Whole Mess” (above) is not a ghost video, it’s a tribute, and a downright chilling one. The really creepy part..? It’s not hyperbole. The information in that video can be confirmed.

Watch it before the videos about ghosts at Eloise, Michigan.

This site was first a stagecoach stop, the Black Horse Tavern. Then it was purchased and turned into a poorhouse, and then became a medical facility. In its various incarnations it was a sanitorium for victims of tuberculosis, and a mental hospital.

Its names included the Eloise Infirmary for the Sick and Elderly, and the Eloise Hospital for the Insane.

Several locations associated with Eloise sound as if they should be haunted. In fact, I’d expect this to be one of the creepiest haunted hospital sites in America.

More history of Eloise:

“Eloise: Mostly a memory” (This video is no longer available at YouTube. I’m keeping this note here, in case it returns. It was a great history.)

Next, “Spirit Caught on Camera In Haunted Eloise Asylum” includes highlights of a brief investigation inside Eloise – Visual anomalies, some clear Ghost Box responses, and lots of NSFW language from the investigators. It’s a good balance of evidence.

Next, a daytime tour by the Dearborn Paranormal Research Society of Michigan. Sound quality is challenging to listen to, dialing the levels up and down, but the information is excellent.

“Eloise Mental Hospital – Ghost Hunters” isn’t the Ghost Hunters’ TV show; it’s a news report by a startled reporter who — apparently — didn’t really expect to encounter anything at Eloise.

Parody? The next video includes a daytime tour by Michigan Paranormal Investigators, interviews about (fictional) Patient 626, and a night-time investigation with impossibly clear EVP. This is how many “ghost stories” are created. In five years, I wouldn’t be surprised to hear about genuine phenomena related to the invented patient’s ghosts.

And now, only to better understand what you’ll find at Eloise, the next video series looked like a Ghost Hunters parody. Mostly, it showed foolhardy investigating, with some inaccurate history thrown in. These 12-year-old kids may have encountered some paranormal activity. But, they made such serious research blunders, it’s impossible to sort fact from fantasy.

The worst part is: They’re clearly breaking the law. This kind of prank is unacceptable and it gives serious ghost hunters a bad name. (Two words: No trespassing. How smart does anyone have to be, to understand what that means? Yes, it’s a rhetorical question borne of frustration.)

[Update: These YouTube videos seem to be online, but can be viewed “by permission only.” I’m leaving the descriptions here in case that changes.]

  • Part One – Stylish introduction, and a quick daytime tour of the key locations at the Eloise site.
  • Part Two – More criminal trespassing. The smokestack building doesn’t seem especially haunted to me, but the visual imagery is impressive. It’s ideal for photographers who like abandoned sites. I’m not convinced that this part of the complex is worth paranormal research.
  • Part Three is more of the same. It shows more criminal activity no 12-year-old should try… or anyone of any other age, either. Mostly, the video shows a bunch of kids scaring themselves. The “reveal” (or summary) starts at 4:41 in the video, and some of the evidence is worth a second look. Unfortunately, this silliness erodes any credibility. That’s just one of many unfortunate aspects of what we see in these videos.

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