When to Go Ghost Hunting

When is the best time to go ghost hunting?

Many researchers prefer to investigate after dark.

Are ghosts more active at night? I’m not sure. Maybe the darkness makes it easier for us to notice them. After all, in the dark, we have fewer visual distractions.

For me, it’s more important to investigate at anniversaries. They’re the dates when someone at that site died, or married, or something significant happened. (Birthdays can be surprisingly good days for ghost hunting, too.)

This video shares more about the best times — days and hours — for ghost hunting.

Of course, your results may be different. If you have suggestions, I hope you’ll share them with Hollow Hill readers. Leave your comments (and questions) at this site.

I’ve created a When to Go Ghost Hunting Worksheet, as well as an instruction sheet for using it.

The worksheet includes more than just times and days. I’ve also added lines for possible triggers that may improve your research results.

The worksheet instructions feature even more suggestions related to research, era cues, and other ways to enhance your investigations, specific to each location.

Here are the PDF links (on Google Drive):

When to Go Ghost Hunting – Worksheet / https://drive.google.com/open?id=1_HSWKNTnx8bFmS7r7lFNtAz9YJH9Izh0

When to Go Ghost Hunting – Worksheet Instructions / https://drive.google.com/open?id=111_cv7Xzo0CaH2TI2NEzYpvp9jMpPZfp

Free Digital Edition of ‘Is Your House Haunted?’

Is Your House Haunted?

If you’re looking for my free, 2013 edition of Is Your House Haunted?, it was (past tense) available through The Authors Club.

Starting in 2016, that site seemed to be in redesign. (See TheAuthorsClub.net, in case the site is back in business.)

As soon as the new edition is available, I’ll share download links here and at my Fiona Broome author website.

Meanwhile, the checklist is still available. Visit my freebies page for this and other free ghost hunting materials.

Here’s how the book was described at The Authors Club.

When Jason Hawes launched The Authors Club — and included the free version of my book — here’s what I’d said:

Have you ever wondered what goes on at a possibly haunted home before the TV cameras start filming?

This book takes you through some of the important steps.  It’s sort of “the investigation before the investigation you see on TV.”

You can download the 2013 edition in either ePub or PDF format, completely free.  Just go to The Authors Club, click on the book link, and select which format you’d like to download.  Registration is free at the site, and so is my book.

This book will also be available in print, at Amazon.com.  The printed book is 140 pages long.

I’m working on a second update to this book — expected before the end of 2016 — as well as a much larger edition for professionals, in digital and print formats.

Here’s the book description:

Is Your House Haunted?  Tips for anyone living in — or investigating — a house that might be haunted.
Written by Fiona Broome, founder of HollowHill.com and Ghosts101.com

If you’ve wondered if your home is haunted, this book will help you find answers… and — in most cases — explain what to do about them.

You’ll discover the leading, normal reasons why some houses seem haunted. You’ll also find out why at least 80% of “haunted” houses don’t have ghosts, and what to do if your home really is haunted.

Based on over 30 years’ research in haunted homes and businesses throughout the U.S., the U.K., Ireland, and Canada, author and paranormal investigator Fiona Broome will show you…

  • What you can investigate on your own, easily.
  • What to do — and what not to do — if your house is haunted.
  • When to call an expert, and what to ask them.
  • How to protect yourself and your family from real and hidden dangers in your (possibly) haunted home.

If your home might be haunted, it’s important to act quickly. This book explains what to do, step-by-step, right now.

 

Halloween Ghost Hunting Checklist

Halloween can be a whirlwind for many ghost hunters.  Events, parties, investigations… and then the big night itself.  Are you ready?

Ideally, Halloween research plans are prepared far ahead of Halloween night.  However, even if you’ve been too busy, it’s not too late to organize your Halloween plans for ghost hunting success.

To help you, I’m sharing my own Halloween checklist.  I’ve used some variation of this, every year for the past dozen or so years.  I hope it’s useful and helps you make the most of Halloween ghost hunting opportunities.

Click here for the Halloween Ghost Hunting Checklist (PDF)

Everyday Ghost Hunting (Report, Mindmap)

Every day can be a fresh opportunity for discovering ghosts and haunted places.  You don’t need to wait for a special event, or find the perfect haunted location in some out-of-the-way place.  You may pass by haunted sites every day, and not realize it.

That little park near your home, office, or school… why is it there, instead of somewhere else? Was there a specific reason it wasn’t used as a building site?

When you’re downtown, what about historical plaques and markers?  People pass them daily, and don’t even realize they’re there.  Many tell stories that could suggest a haunting.

In quiet, downtown Tilton, NH, a plain white apartment building was once a hotel, and welcomed famous guests like Edison, Ford, and Firestone.  It had also been a rooming house for factory workers.  Though I found no ghost stories there, I wondered what other, unassuming sites might have equally colorful histories and have ghosts.

Researching a midwest site, I discovered a noted Native American mound that had been reduced to a very small pile of dirt.  The rest of it had been used to fill nearby gardens and roadways.  Does it harbor residual energy, or even spirits that protect what’s left of it?

I’m not sure, but it’s the kind of site you might walk or drive past daily, and not think about as a potential haunt.

In this report — and the accompanying mindmap — I share tips for including ghost hunting in your everyday routines.

Click here for the Everyday Ghost Hunting Report (PDF)

Click here for the Everyday Ghost Hunting Mindmap
(PDF for 8.5″ x 14″ paper)

Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context

Ghost hunting often puts us in touch with tragic events from the past. Emotions can influence how we interpret cues and events related to a haunting.

However, what we think is tragic today… it might not have been so horrific in the past.

Understanding history can be essential when you are trying to:

  • Understand the quirky things that seem to activate a residual energy haunting.
  • Identify a ghost, and the era he or she is from.
  • Figure out why the ghost remains here, and whether his (or her) story is true… and enough to trigger a haunting.
  • Put active sites into an historical context that makes sense.

That’s why I wrote Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context.  It’s a three-page report describes some harsh realities of the past.

It explains why many stories and grave markers that seem so tragic, today, may not tell the whole story or even the correct one.  Those hauntings might be related to a very different story.

This isn’t a cheerful report.  You may be shocked by some of the statistics.  But, to really understand ghosts and their stories, a glimpse into the past can be important.

Here’s my related podcast from 2012: Ghost Hunting and Historic Context

Here’s that report link: Ghost Hunting – Keeping Tragedy in Context