Finding Haunted Sites Using Old, Online Books

In my earlier article, Using History to Find Haunted Sites, I talked about visiting the public library to study dusty old books.

You may have similar success using old books that are online.  From Gutenberg to the Internet Public Library, you can search for references to forgotten haunts at book- and magazine-related websites.

Generally, I start my search with the name of the location.  I want a site I can visit, easily.

Then, I add words such as:

  • ghost, ghosts, apparitions, specters, spectres
  • haunts, haunted
  • tragedy
  • murder
  • massacre

(The latter three terms are because most hauntings relate to one or more of four themes:  Money, power, drama, and tragedy.)

Next, I browse the results to see if any seem worth further study.

For example, I wanted to find forgotten ghosts in Lexington, Massachusetts.  So, I entered “lexington ghosts haunted” … and found a ghost story in Germany.

Konigsmark’s ghost – Germany

It seems that Philipp Christoph, count von Königsmark, vanished in 1694 after a presumed affair with Sophia Dorothea, wife of the future George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II.

One version of the story claims that Königsmark was killed on the orders of George I’s father, and the body was weighted with stones and thrown into the river.  Another version says that the body was found, either strangled or in pieces (or both), beneath the floorboards of Princess Sophia’s dressing room.

According to the Quarterly Review (Volume 89) published in 1851, “It was long believed that Konigsmark’s ghost haunted the palace where we now know his body lay—and Mr. Cressett, in a subsequent letter, relates that it was supposed to have appeared on so incongruous an occasion as the ballet at a court opera.”

Sophia was divorced by her husband, and she was imprisoned for the rest of her life.  So, her story adds to the tragedy.

I’m not sure if the haunted castle is Hanover Castle, Leineschloss, and — so far — I’m not seeing any modern reports of ghost hunting at that site, or in connection with this tragic tale.  If I were in Germany, I’d definitely look for additional information.

Note: As I continued researching Konigsmark’s ghost stories in dusty old books, I found this odd reference — not to Konigsmark, but to ghosts in general, from 1852 — “Reichenbach says, that ‘thousands of ghost stories will now receive a natural explanation,’ from his discovery that the decomposition of animal matter is accompanied by light, or luminous vapour, which is visible to certain sensitive persons.”

I’ll go back and study this research, later.  For now, it’s an interesting theory and I’d want to see supporting evidence.

Narrowing the search for ghosts

Next, I narrowed my search with the words “lexington massachusetts ghosts haunted” and discovered ghost references related to Henry David Thoreau, Henry James and William Dean Howells… at Boston’s Beacon Hill.

Noting those for future research, I continued my search and discovered — in a magazine from 1873 — “…there are four distinct visitations which defy exorcism. One is the Newburyport school-house visitor; a second is a woman who haunts the tenders of the locomotives in Central New York; a third is a mysterious comer, always seen shovelling snow at dawn in certain villages of Massachusetts; a fourth is one who plays pranks with telegraphic instruments in Dubuque.”

I’m pretty sure that I know the Newburyport story — set at Charles Street Schoolhouse — since debunked.  The other tales sound a little vague (and therefore incredible) but they might be worth additional research.  I’ll keep them in mind if I see a second reference to any of them.

The research road leads to Concord

Finally, I found a reference that mentioned a ghost in Concord, Massachusetts.  It’s near enough to Lexington that I stopped my search there.

Though the story sounds like fiction, a few reference points might be worth exploring.  I’d be looking for the home of Jerusha Billings (b. 1818), and I’d also look for maps of the early highways around Concord, particularly the ones that are dirt roads today.  I keep seeing references to multiple haunted houses — perhaps abandoned sites — along those roads.

So, during a two-hour search this morning, I didn’t find detailed ghost reports that I can use for immediate paranormal investigations.

However, I found enough odd references to ghosts that my time was well spent.  Those are stories I’ll research in more detail, as time permits.

I hope that gives you some ideas for finding unreported and under-reported ghosts and haunted places near you.  Online or at the public library, you may find some great, forgotten, true ghost stories.

Photo credit: Castle Hill in Quedlinburg by Kriss Szkurlatowski

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