Patterns, Predictions, and Why I’m a Paranormal Researcher

Late tonight (Monday, June 18/19), I’ll be on George Noory’s “Coast to Coast AM” radio show. So, knowing my knack for blurting things that aren’t quite what I’d planned to say, I’ve been working on videos to describe my work.

(I’m hoping the show goes well, but if I manage to speak before thinking, my newest videos are sort of preemptive damage control. LOL)

The following video explains why I love paranormal research, and – even after all these years – I’m still enthusiastic about my work. I’ve developed a very specific focus for my research, and an equally clear goal.

Of course, this work is an ongoing project, and – as it unfolds – it becomes more fascinating, every day. That’s what makes it fun.

If you’d like to hear me speak on George Noory’s show, here’s his site’s description of it. I’ll be on the second half of the show, starting around 3 AM, Eastern US time. The show will be recorded so you can listen to it later.

(I like how he describes me & my research.)

Fiona Broome on George Noory's "Coast to Coast AM" radio show.

Coast to Coast AM subscribers can hear the replay almost immediately.

In addition, Coast to Coast AM shows are available at YouTube, about three weeks after they initially aired.

Gilson Tee-Shirt – Sad or Funny?

Gilson Tee-Shirt
What’s your reaction to this shirt? Sad? Funny? Something else?

A Gilson Road tee-shirt is available at Amazon. I’m interested in what my friends think about it.

Frankly, I laughed out loud when I saw the shirt.

But when I posted about it at my Facebook page, the reaction was mixed.

Is this tee-shirt disrespectful?

Clearly, some people feel that way. I’m not happy when long-time researchers – who take this field seriously – are upset by those who take ghost hunting lightly.

I’m also sensitive when people ridicule paranormal research, as if we’re stupid, gullible, and prone to an over-active imagination.

Unfortunately, ghost hunting lost considerable credibility over the past few years. A lot of that can be blamed on the editing of ghost hunting TV shows. They were so sensationalized and so preposterous, they started looking like self-parodies.

That was sad.

It’s also a natural decay that happens to most fads and pop trends. I try to be realistic about these things.

On the positive side, I’m seeing a new generation of ghost hunters enter this field. That’s exciting. We need their challenging questions, and their unorthodox viewpoints.

With those fresh viewpoints, I’m also seeing a kind-of-snarky, kind-of-hipster humor. It’s self-deprecating, in a way.

It’s like they’re saying, “Yes, this subject is kind of ridiculous. It interests me anyway. I want to know the truth about ghosts.”

As long as people take the research seriously, I’m okay with the humor, even when it shows up as tee-shirts. If sarcastic humor keeps new researchers from running out the door in terror… that’s fine with me.

I might buy one of these tee-shirts, myself. It could spark an interesting conversation at the grocery store.

Every story I hear and every question I’m asked can be a very good thing.

  • Questions are good. They keep us looking in fresh directions.
  • First-person stories are even better. The more data points we collect, the clearer our understanding of what’s going on at haunted places, including Gilson Road Cemetery.

So yes, my first impulse is to get one of these shirts and wear it, just to see what happens.

On the other hand, I wouldn’t want to offend people. I know that, at times, my humor can be a bit raw and unconventional.

I’d like to know whether this kind of tee-shirt is sad, amusing, or in really poor taste.

Update: One reader gently reminded me that the tee-shirt audience isn’t entirely that “new generation” of ghost hungers.

As she said, a certain generation created the expression, “Been there. Done that. Got the tee-shirt.” And, for her, it’s still a thrill to have a tee-shirt as a memento of an adventure, or a series of adventures.

She’s right. I should have remembered this when I wrote my original article. Also, I know that many of my friends and fans have been part of the Hollow Hill community since the 1990s. I dashed off this article too quickly. I apologize.

What’s your opinion?

If You Think Ghost Hunting is “Weird”…

If you ever meet people who think ghost hunting is a “weird” hobby, this photo of a gravedigger may change their perspective.

gravedigger woman - her hobby

It’s a 1944 photo from the (U.S.) Library of Congress.

Yes, it’s a little old woman, wearing a dress, a hat, and an apron.

And she’s a gravedigger.

The notes with this photo say, “Meet Mrs. Josephine Smith, aged 84, whose hobby is digging graves. She lives in Drouin, a typical little farming town (1100 people), in southern Australia, 60 miles out of the Victorian capital, Melbourne. …”

Maybe I’ve lived an insulated life, but in all my decades of trekking around haunted cemeteries, I’ve never met anyone digging a grave “for fun.”

Armchair Ghost Hunting? TV Show Experiments

This might be “armchair ghost hunting,” and it’s a little early to talk about it. But, thanks to Halloween TV shows & movies, this may be a good opportunity to test a theory I’m exploring.

And, if this idea appeals to you, it’s an ideal time for you to play along, as well.

This is sort of like treating the TV (or your computer monitor) as if it’s haunted.

Here’s what I’m doing

armchair ghost hunting - via the TV?For the past couple of months, I’ve been watching ghost hunting shows — mostly old Ghost Adventures episodes, and the newest season of Most Haunted.

I’ve been watching both shows on Really, a British cable network. (Ghost Adventures isĀ  available on Hulu and online, too, but I haven’t tried those resources, yet. )

I’ve watched TV with my Ovilus III next to me, set to dictionary mode. I’ve used a pen & paper to note the results.

I wanted to see if the Ovilus “said” anything, and if the words were a good match for whatever was happening on the TV.

Ordinarily, my home has few EMF spikes, so the Ovilus is not likely to react, even if I leave it on for an extended time.

The Ovilus III has a 2,048 word vocabulary, but I haven’t estimated the odds of a “close match” during a typical ghost hunting show. (I’m not sure it’s possible to calculate that.)

These are my results, so far

Watching Most Haunted, my results have been vastly better if I research the location, first.

That suggests a connection between my awareness and what the Ovilus says.

Since I haven’t looked ahead in the UKTV listings, to see which Ghost Adventures episodes were scheduled, I haven’t researched them at all.

But, in general, the Ovilus seems more chatty during Ghost Adventures than during Most Haunted. In fact, some Ghost Adventures episodes seem to send the Ovilus on a tirade.

At best, I’ve seen about 20% correlation between the Ovilus’ words and what was on the TV screen at that moment.

Until today, I wasn’t sure this experiment was worth an hour a day.

Ovilus III v. a “control” word list

Today, before turning on Ghost Adventures, I decide to try a “control” list of words. Would they match the TV show as closely as the Ovilus did?

To test this, I printed a list of 50 random words. (I used a random word generator.)*

Right away, I saw six (of 50) words that could match almost any Ghost Adventures episodes: hunt, ask, call, shivering, spooky, and terrify.

Then, it was time for Ghost Adventures. (In the U.S., Eastern time zone, it starts at noon on weekdays.) Today’s episode was from 2012, Horror Hotels and Deadliest Hospitals.

I kept the Ovilus running — and took notes — even through the commercial breaks.

As the Ovilus “spoke,” I noted it by the next sequential word on the random list. (That is, until the Ovilus spoke, I didn’t count the random word, even if it was a good match for the TV show. In addition, I followed the exact sequence of the random words list; I didn’t skip around.)

This is far from scientific, but it’s a start.

Today’s results

During the show and its commercials, the Ovilus spoke 45 times.

11 of the Ovilus’ words were a good match for the what was happening on the TV. (In general, the Ovilus seemed to speak about two to three seconds before the matching moment on the show. I didn’t stretch the window beyond that.)

Only five of the words on the random list were a good match at the same time. And, of the six that seemed likely to fit any Ghost Adventures scene, only one — the word “spooky” — correlated to what was going on, at the time.

Some of my decisions were admittedly biased. When Zak was talking about a skeptic, the Ovilus said “jerk.” That’s the word I would have used, myself, so I counted it.

When two voices spoke in EVP, almost simultaneously, a counted the random word “double” as a good match. (The Ovilus had said “yield” at that moment; clearly, that was not a match.)

As I said, this isn’t scientific at all, but it makes sense to me. It’s a starting point.

The most interesting part of today’s experiment was during the scenes at the Goldfield Hotel, where — as Zak and his team investigated — a brick had moved on its own.

As Zak showed what had happened, my Ovilus said a rapid sequence of words, none of which seemed relevant. (The words were: bones, short, outside, carrier, and eat.)

But, it was so different from the Ovilus’ behavior during the rest of the show — and during my other, similar experiments — it may be noteworthy.

Or, yes… it may be a coincidence.

What’s next

Today’s test may have been a fluke. My previous experiments weren’t consistent enough (or dramatic enough) to decide anything.

So, ordinarily, I’d wait to talk about this.

But, if you want to try some “armchair ghost hunting,” the next few days will provide some great opportunities… better than usual.

All you need is any device that seems to respond to ghostly energy. (Even a homemade pendulum might work.) It doesn’t have to be as fancy as an Ovilus.

If you’re using an electronic ghost hunting device, turn it on while you’re watching a ghost-related TV show, movie, or documentary.

For lower-tech tools, just set them up as if you’re in a haunted location.

Note the results.

If you test this, I hope you’ll tell me what happens, in comments on the HollowHill.com article.

I’ll continue my own tests. When I reach a conclusion, I’ll post a new article.

For now, I think this could be interesting, but there may be a lot of trial-and-error to fine-tune this. So, your input (and results, even if they’re ho-hum) could be very helpful.

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*Since posting this, I’ve improved the control option. I copied the Ovilus III word list and numbered it. (That link – updated so it prints on just 13 pages – is a PDF at Google Drive.)

Then, I’m using a random number generator (selecting 50 numbers among 1 through 2048) to choose enough words for a typical Ghost Adventures episode.

After that, I’m using the numbers to create a sequential list of Ovilus words, based on what the random number generator selected. (Same order, but listing the corresponding words from the Ovilus III list. I hope that makes sense; this is easier than it probably sounds.)

In theory, this should tell me whether the Ovilus’ choice of words is more accurate than a wholly random selection from the same collection of words.

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Update: Thursday, 26 Jun 2017

Using the Ovilus III word list is a big improvement. I think it’s a more specialized list than the Random Word Generator list I’d tried, earlier.

In other words (no pun intended), the RWG list included words that were more generic and could fit a wider range of events. So, it seemed to match more moments on the TV.

Today, I tried two different word lists. Both were randomized from the Ovilus III list. After watching the King’s Tavern episode of Ghost Adventures, I was astonished.

During Ghost Adventures, out of 41 times the Ovilus was triggered, 12 words “said” by the Ovilus were a good match, and one more was close (but not quite right).

Usually, the randomized words weren’t even close. One of the lists matched twice (with a so-so third match). The other list had no matches at all.

This suggests that the Ovilus really is doing more than just spitting out random words from its dictionary.

Of course, I’ll continue these experiments. It’s too soon to reach any conclusions, but these early results are intriguing.

Update: Monday, 13 Nov 2017

I’m still testing this, and have expanded my viewing to include Ghost Chasers on Really.

The more I work with this idea, the better it looks. In the past week, there’s been an increase in exact match, topical words said by the Ovilus, seconds before someone on the TV says the same words.

So, yes, it looks like this works.

But, I’m not convinced the percentage of accurate responses is worth the time & effort.

And, I still need to compare my TV research with on-site research at the same site.

New Feature: Ask Fiona

ghostbatAs I’m writing this, Halloween is fast approaching. It’s “ghost season” for those of us who investigate haunted sites.

Many investigators — new and experienced — have questions about ghosts, ghost hunting, and haunted places.

I may be able to answer them.

Ask your question in the comment form, below.

(Though you’ll see it, immediately, the public won’t see your comment until I manually approve it. If you’d like me to keep it hidden, tell me that or use the “comments are always hidden” Ask Fiona page.)

If a question needs a lengthy reply, I’ll write an article to answer it, as time permits. I’m creating an “Ask Fiona” series at this website, for those in-depth replies.

Leave a comment below, and ask me anything about ghosts, haunted places, and related paranormal research.